Aa
A
A
A
Close
Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Community
7.04k Members
Avatar universal

Aldara

At the end of October I saw a couple of bumps on the inside of my butt that worried me.  I was also having some other symptoms so I decided to go see a doctor.  It's hard for me to take time off of work so I went to the Urgent Care instead.  When I got there the doctors did routine tests for Chlamydia and Gonorrhea and it turns out that I had Chlamydia.  While the doctor was taking the swabs from the inside of my vagina, I mentioned the bumps and asked him to look at them.  He said they were nothing and I didn't need to worry about them.  He was not a gynecologist, just a general practitioner.  A couple of weeks later I thought I had a yeast infection so I went back to the same urgent care and asked to be tested for a yeast infection or a bacterial infection since I was having some more issues.  I had a different doctor this time.  While she was down there I asked to look at the bumps on the insides of my butt cheeks also.  I told her I thought they might be skin tags.  She said, "They do look like skin tags but I think they're probably warts."  She was an acupuncturist.  So she prescribed me Aldara and I used it for two weeks but after two weeks the side effects were really bad so I stopped using it for a week.  After that week the side effects from Aldara had all cleared up and I wen to go put the cream on again only to discover that my "warts" were gone.  Is it normal that the warts would clear up after only two weeks with Aldara?  I have always had a really good immune system but that just seems really fast.  Is it possible that it was something else?  The bumps or whatever really did look like skin tags.  They were long and truncated.  There were three of them but they were all separate.  None of them touched each other.  They didn't get any bigger from the time I noticed them to the time that I noticed they were gone.

Now I don't have any more warts but I am still wondering if that is even what I had in the first place.  I don't want to go off half cocked and tell future partners that I have had genital warts if it's not true.  Is there any way I can find out for sure if I am infected with HPV?  I know I can get a pap but will that be able to tell me if the kind I have is what caused the warts or would it just generally say that I have it but they don't know which strain?  I have a gyno appointment on the 3rd and i am planning to ask them about it when I get there but I was just hoping to find out if there was something specific I need to be asking or asking for.  I wish I had gone to a gyno in the first place because I would have been able to trust that opinion but I can't really trust either of these two doctors because they both told me something different.

I know it's wordy but any insight would be great!  Thanks!
1 Responses
Avatar universal
Hrm.

Well, the aldara website says that people have noticed changes within a few weeks to14 weeks, so I guess it's maybe possible? But I don't know, that still does sound kind of fast.

All I can personally suggest is to watch and see if more "warts" show up, as well as take vitamin supplements and exercise to keep that healthy immune system of your active.

I hope someone can come spread some more insight for you.

Good luck! :)
Top STDs Answerers
3149845 tn?1506631371
fort lauderdale, FL
Learn About Top Answerers
Popular Resources
Here are 16 facts you need to know to protect yourself from contracting or spreading a sexually transmitted disease.
How do you keep things safer between the sheets? We explore your options.
Can HIV be transmitted through this sexual activity? Dr. Jose Gonzalez-Garcia answers this commonly-asked question.
A breakthrough study discovers how to reduce risk of HIV transmission by 95 percent.
Dr. Jose Gonzalez-Garcia provides insight to the most commonly asked question about the transfer of HIV between partners.
The warning signs of HIV may not be what you think. Our HIV and STD expert Sean Cummings reports in-depth on the HIV "Triad" and other early symptoms of this disease.