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Should I tell?

My ex-sister in law has Huntington's. She is and has always been a selfish, self-absorbed, lying, scheming, person with no ethics. She had two daughters with my brother. Prior to that, she had a son when she was a teenager and gave the baby up to live with his paternal grandmother. All children are basically adults now. The two daughters are now aware that this disease runs in the family and they have a chance of getting it. The son knows nothing of this and there is no relationship between he and his mother.
He and I did develop a small kinship during his childhood and remain Facebook friends. I've not seen him in 18 years. He does have a daughter himself.
He wants nothing to do with his mother/sisters so there is no way for him to become aware of this disease and that he (and his daughter) may be at risk.
So my question is this : Should I arrange to meet with him and give this information? Is it better to know of the possibility and make choices based on that, or remain blind and possibly have this sneak up on you as you age?
It's so hard to determine what's right to do in this situation. I am quite certain that there is no other way for him to find out about this unless I tell him - until possibly a doctor gives him a diagnosis.
Is it better to not know? Better to know? I think I would want to know but I am not in that situation and should hardly what's right for him.
Any advice would be greatly appreciate.

Thanks
DM
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