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femoral artery bruit

In early September, I underwent a heart cath to rule out any blockages due to several abnormal EKGs since April which had shown ST rhythm changes (which continued to change during that time.)   In the end, no problems were found.   However, when I went back to the cardio. for the 5 week checkup, he heard a bruit over the incision site in my rt. groin.   He sent me for an ultrasound to rule out an AV fistula.   The ultrasound didn't show any fistula, but the ultrasound tech pointed out one area to the dr. and said something about "high velocity here".    The cardio. said no, that he thought that wasn't a problem area, that it was just the insertion site of the cath healing itself.   (My artery was closed with a StarClose device.)   I am also a worrier!!   He said he would recheck in 6 months, but in the meantime, I'm concerned . . what could cause a bruit, and are they dangerous?  Is this somewhat normal after a heart cath to find a femoral bruit?  I'm 39, thin, nonsmoker, good cholesterol levels, no other issues beyond the ST changes and GERD (which I take Zantac for).  I have a lot of anxiety which causes my BP to become high, esp. at dr.'s office, but generally it is okay (around 120/30s over 80s).    What do you think about the bruit?   Again, I am worried that something has gone wrong with the healing from the cath.
3 Responses
290383 tn?1193100321
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
A bruit is caused by turbulence of blood flow and it can sometimes suggest an area of artery blockage.  It is possible that the artery could have been mildly compressed by the closure device and this might cause the bruit.  I would suggest a repeat duplex scan but I suspect this is unlikely to be along term problem.
Avatar universal
A related discussion, r femeral bruit was started.
Avatar universal
A related discussion, Groin was started.

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