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Lymes and Lymphnodes...Am I crazy?!

Almost a year ago to date I started getting sick and also noticed a swollen lymphnode under my armpit. My internist sent me for a baseline mammogram and ultrasound (I'm 36) Both came back normal. A few months later I got my Lyme diagnosis. I've been on 2 separate rounds of antibiotics but the lymphnode is still swollen and at times painful. Has anyone had experience with this
? I feel like I'm losing my mind and have convinced myself I have lymphoma or breast cancer. Is becoming completely crazy a side effect of Lyme :(
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Avatar universal
Anyone????
19541290 tn?1479741797
I just finished reading 4 books on Lyme disease and I read that brain fog and mental problems happen with this infection.  Lyme disease is known to cause neurological symptoms.  
2 Comments
Did it say anything about swollen lyphnodes?
The UC Davis study

Swollen lymph nodes, or lymphadenopathy, is one of the hallmarks of Lyme disease, although it has been unclear why this occurs or how it affects the course of the disease. The UC Davis research team set out to explore in mice the mechanisms that cause the enlarged lymph nodes and to determine the nature of the resulting immune response.

They found that when mice were infected with B. burgdorferi, these live spirochetes accumulated in the animals' lymph nodes. The lymph nodes responded with a strong, rapid accumulation of B cells, white blood cells that produce antibodies to fight infections. Also, the presence of B. burgdorferi caused the destruction of the distinct architecture of the lymph node that usually helps it to function normally.
19541290 tn?1479741797
Not getting much help here are we?

UC Davis study

Swollen lymph nodes, or lymphadenopathy, is one of the hallmarks of Lyme disease, although it has been unclear why this occurs or how it affects the course of the disease. The UC Davis research team set out to explore in mice the mechanisms that cause the enlarged lymph nodes and to determine the nature of the resulting immune response.

They found that when mice were infected with B. burgdorferi, these live spirochetes accumulated in the animals' lymph nodes. The lymph nodes responded with a strong, rapid accumulation of B cells, white blood cells that produce antibodies to fight infections. Also, the presence of B. burgdorferi caused the destruction of the distinct architecture of the lymph node that usually helps it to function normally.
1 Comments
I would remove the duplicate post but I don't know how to.
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