Aa
A
A
A
Close
Lymphedema Community
147 Members
Avatar universal

High Lympocytes

I have had two blood tests recently, both show High Lymphocytes and Low Neutrophils. My father and sister both had and have Lymphoma.  So I am concerned.  My docotor said since my WBC is ok 6 and 6 they are not concerned.  HCT was low on both tests also at 36.1 and 36.9 RBC low at 4.1 and 3.99

I dont' want to wait until I get a lump to find out I have lymphoma but my GP doens't know what to recommend next and doesn't seem as concerned as I am.  Is there another test I can have done to put me at ease or find out what is going on.  Everything I google on the internet says could be linked to Lymphoma.
1 Responses
351246 tn?1379685732
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Hi!
Low hematocrit is due to anemia, malnutrition, destruction of red cells by spleen, bone marrow failure, and blood loss as in stomach ulcers and irritable bowel disease or in kidney stones. Leukemia, multiple myeloma and rheumatoid arthritis are the other problems with low hematocrit.
Persistent neutropenia can be due to Vit B12 or folate deficiency or due to viral infection. Blood cancers including lymphomas either result in very low or very high counts. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy and certain autoimmune disorders also result in neutropenia. Since lymphocytes are high, hematocrit, neutrophils and RBC are low, you do need to take the test again. However, the pictures as of now are not too abnormal as seen in Lymphoma. However, if you have sweating, weakness, loss of appetite, swollen lymph nodes then yes, this blood picture should raise serious questions. Otherwise, though the findings are abnormal, they are marginally so ad need regular follow up. Do discuss this with your doctor. Take care!

The medical advice given should not be considered a substitute for medical care provided by a doctor who can examine you. The advice may not be completely correct for you as the doctor cannot examine you and does not know your complete medical history. Hence this reply to your post should only be considered as a guiding line and you must consult your doctor at the earliest for your medical problem.
Have an Answer?
Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
New study links cell phones to slightly increased cancer risk. Should you be concerned?
A list of national and international resources and hotlines to help connect you to needed health and medical services.
Here’s how your baby’s growing in your body each week.
These common ADD/ADHD myths could already be hurting your child
This article will tell you more about strength training at home, giving you some options that require little to no equipment.
In You Can Prevent a Stroke, Dr. Joshua Yamamoto and Dr. Kristin Thomas help us understand what we can do to prevent a stroke.