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1139187 tn?1355710247

Questions on testosterone replacement

Can anyone tell me if they have had luck with androgel pumps?     My free level is in range but my t level is 255 range 250 to 1200.

I am hypothyroid and the last time I tried the pump and the patch it made me feel worse.

Also,  if the required dosing is 4 pumps, is it ok to just start with 2?

Thank you
5 Responses
Avatar universal
Androgel has worked well for me. I started at 2 pumps per day, then was increased to 3, then finally 4 per day. I've been on that dose for over 2 years and my t-level is 782. I do not have hypothyroidism, but do have osteoporosis. Hope this helps.
1139187 tn?1355710247
AJ99,  has your bone density gotten any better?   What were your side effects from the pump?  I tried it about 6 months ago, made it about 30 days on the stuff.  It made me very irritable, cranky, and my boys ached from high holy hell every day.   how long did you do your 2 to 3, then 3-4?
Avatar universal
Hi Bruce,

Actually, I am waiting for the results of a bone density scan I had done about a week ago. I'll let you know the results when I get them.  I am also taking Actonel 150mg monthly for the osteoporosis. As far as side effects, I have not experienced any in any form. Everything appears all right down below. If I recall, I was on 2 actuations per day for about 6 months and then had a t-level taken which dictated increasing the dose to 3 actuations. In another 6 months, the same story, so I was increased to 4 actuations. For a short time I was on 5 actuations due to complaint of tiredness and low libido, but the blood level got too high, so I went back to 4 and everything seems fine.  Previous to the gel, I was on the patch which I actually liked better despite the irritation around the application site. It posed less of a risk of transfer to wife and kids. My endo said he had better results with his patients with the gel and that is why I was switched.  Even before that, I was on different meds to help with fertility. I can tell you about that later if you want.  

I hope this helps. Good luck with your regimen.

AJ99
1139187 tn?1355710247
One more question,  does completely shut off natural production, or does it compliment it?


Thank u
Avatar universal
First of all, I'm not an expert. That said, everything I've read indicates that long term testosterone replacement does shut down natural production which eventually leads to your balls getting smaller (testicular atrophy). Some reports suggest that if you discontinue t-replacement therapy there may be a way to stimulate natural production although not to the level it was prior. Chronic use may prevent that from happening. In my case, I had no choice and will probably be on replacement therapy for life. I've been on replacement therapy for over 15 years and show no sign of atrophy. Hopefully never will, but if it happens I guess I will have to live with it. Prior to t-therapy, I was on weekly doses of HCG and Pergonal for 2 years to stimulate sperm production. My balls actually got bigger. When we gave up on the fertility issues, I was switched to t-replacement therapy and to date have experienced no problems.  I would suggest that before you go too far with replacement therapy, you have a lengthy, informed discussion with your doctor or get an endocrinology consult on these issues if you have not done so already.

Good luck.
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