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Subtle Sting Present After UTI 2 Months Ago, Prostatitis?

Hello,

Just over 2 months ago, I have unprotected sex with a female partner and experienced burning sensation in the groins/pubic region. I got tested for all STDs, with everything being negative. I did have a urine sample done, they found positive nitrates in my urine, which indicated a UTI. I was on cipro for 10 days, symptoms persisted so then I went to the urologist afterwards who then performed an exam, and said my prostate felt normal. He then "concluded" the I had prostatitis (which i found hard to believe after sex). he prescribed me another 30 days of cipro, and when I was done with that I was on Doxycycline for 2 weeks. Upon discussion, he said i could be experiencing chronic prostatitis? which is what I find hard to believe since that is super rare if not unheard of for just having sex.

From Feb 8th to now, I have experienced a wild ride of sensations in that area. Sometimes when i go for long walks, i don't feel it as much, when i sit down, i begin to think I'm feeling something. It is almost like an annoying sting in between my penis and bum. I also do notice that it is a little red around my urethra? but not sure if that means much.

What am I exactly experiencing? and if so, what can I do to alleviate symptoms as much as possible? it is very very hard living with a pain everyday and I am trying my best to forget about it.

Thank you.
1 Responses
207091 tn?1337709493
Have they sent your urine in for culture to see if you have any bacteria in your urine?

You could have CPPS, or chronic prostatitis. It's actually not that rare, and while it seems to many happen to men after sex, the correlation or causation seems unknown at this point.

Redness at your urethra is a pretty common sign of prostatitis.

There are different types of prostatitis - bacterial and non-bacterial. Bacterial, obviously, is caused by a bacteria, which is why I asked if they've sent your urine for testing. Non-bacterial is harder, because it's harder to treat.

Some things others have mentioned that help are eliminating caffeine and alcohol, especially the caffeine.

Are you being treated by a urologist? If you aren't, you should find one.
5 Comments
Hi,

Yes i did all the tests. they would have mentioned something to me if they found something. With Covid-19 it seems like treatment for anything is hard these days. the only treatment he gave me was for bacterial prostatitis, which is what he thought at the beginning. I finished all my antibiotics so I'm sure there is no more bacteria at this point. All doctors offer are over the phone appointments, which really do not do anything for me.

Is CPPS or chronic prostatitis for life? will i eventually feel normal again?
Don't rely on them to mention if they found something. Follow up. This site is full of stories of doctors forgetting to mention test results, or losing test results, etc. Follow up.

If they found bacteria, maybe you weren't on the right antibiotic for that bacteria.

CPPS is chronic - that's all that's really known right now. There's no cure, but some men find relief. The biggest way I've seen here is eliminating caffeine. (I know that sucks.) Eliminating alcohol is second, but caffeine is far and away the biggest way to find relief.

It's a Wiki article, but this one isn't a bad summary for a starting place - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronic_prostatitis/chronic_pelvic_pain_syndrome

https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/437745-overview

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6040620/

Research everything and find a urologist you like and who knows about CPPS. If there is a teaching hospital near you, try there. They are usually the most up to date on things.

Hang in there, ok? Also, search this forum. We have a bunch of other men with this. Maybe you can learn from each other.
Thank you so much for your help.

Would this not be a chronic bacterial prostatitis case? sometimes bacteria can go undetected in the prostate and i read that prostate massages and draining it regularly while taking antibiotics helps. It is hard to clear, and yet to this day, I would find it very hard to believe i got non-bacterial prostatitis from a bacterial infection i had right after sex! it does not make sense to me. so far this is the only conclusion i could draw. Also chronic non-bacterial prostatitis often comes out of nowhere.

Again if i felt pain 2 days after i had sex and there was bacteria, wouldn't it be sufficient to say its chronicle bacterial prostatitis? If i never had sex with her I bet i would have 0 symptoms today..

Well, it would seem to be bacterial. That's why I asked about your urine results.

There is still so much unknown about this, and I hate saying that, but there are a lot of men who post here who've had sex, and a few days later get these symptoms, no bacteria is found - and you all test for literally everything. I don't know if the actual action of sex is somehow the cause, if something gets triggered that way, or it's something else. Some of you have nitrites, some don't.

Some are bothered by certain foods - someone else just posted that eating pineapple just set them way back, for example - and others find that eliminating caffeine helps.

It's hard to say if it's bacterial now, since testing on or shortly after antibiotics can skew test results. You'd need to wait a few weeks to get accurate results.

You'd really be better off talking to other men about this. I'm female and not ever going to experience this. I'm relaying what I've read. If you go to the main forum here - https://www.medhelp.org/forums/Mens-Health/show/93 - and just scroll - you'll see a ton more men in your exact situation. You could really help each other out.
Or try our Urology forum - https://www.medhelp.org/forums/Urology/show/52
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