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What disorder is it and what is the probable treatment?

Hi!
My nephew has some kind of brain problem. When season hits extreme like cold winters and hot summers, it's usually the time when his exams are around the corner.
So he starts feeling angry, breaking things no matter what kind, he tries to break them, tries to fight anyone who's in his line of sight, he starts walking and like 40°C of summer and 4°C of winter don't affect him, he doesn't sit under shade in summer much less under air conditioner nor does he wears warm clothes in winter.
He doesn't  sleep in night. If we confine him, he starts punching walls untill his hands start bleeding but he doesn't stop.He feels pain but acts like he doesn't. He has no awareness of social norms.
He's always listening to music and singing out loud like he's shouting no matter if it's a happy occasion or sad occasion. He's always singing out loud.

Everything bugs him, irritates him.


We took him to lots of doctors but they always prescribed same medicines which didn't work.
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973741 tn?1342342773
How old is he? I have some thoughts but will start with that.
Helpful - 0
5 Comments
He's 20-24 yrs old.
And he's situation usually remains for one, tow or three months and after that he becomes normal.
What meds did they give him, and what did they diagnose?
Paroxetine
Olanzapine+flouextine
Quetapine

About diagnose though, some say it's psychological problem, some say his brain has had some swelling but it's gone after treatment and these are the after effects which are gonna remain.
Okay, I also have a teen son that has had similar struggles. I wonder if he is not neurodiverse. Has this come up before? Autistic, adhd, add, sensory integration disorder. what you describe is similar to things you can see when that is the case. My son had nights/days all backwards. Boy that was hard. He does take an ssri. He takes lexapro. He's had others and in fact we had quite a med journey. He's olanzapine +flourextine along with paxil is an odd combo. Quetapine at a low dose will help with night time sleep. It knocks you out. But at the higher dose, it helps with mood disorders. It IS often added for neurodiverse teens and young adults.

We backed off of some meds for my son. He was on a mega cocktail. He now takes his SSRI. And then melatonin at night. Just 3 mg for him (more did not give any greater value). We use light therapy too. So, in the morning, we use a light made for this but it's 10000 watts with no UV. It just helps with the circadian rhythm.

To me, your nephew sounds like he may be on the autistic spectrum. My son is as well, diagnosed at 17.5 years old. It requires at least one really supportive parent. They work to help them. Work to validate feelings, thoughts and LISTEN to them. You can't force an adult (which he is) to sleep at night. But you can talk about how that will impact him. How is he going to work, have a life? Maybe he will work a night shift somewhere, I mean. It's his life. My son was gaming at night, watching stuff. But wide awake and then sleeping during the day. I left him be. But then he started college and that didn't work as well. So, that's when we began shifting things. Many nights he doesn't get in bed before 1 but it's a lot better. But treating an adult with respect is important. Restraining him is probably not the right move.

what is he doing at night when he's up?

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