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Avatar universal

Compulsive lying

Hey there
Someone mentioned compulsive lying as a possible symptom for bipolar in another post. I'd never heard of it being a symptom before.
I have bipolar II, but had never really thought about it, but I did compulsively lie for years when I was manic.
I haven't for a long time (10years or more), but recently during a rather bad manic phase found myself doing it again. I usually feel very annoyed and disappointed with myself when I realise I have lied, but it's often hours later when I think "Oh my god, I totally lied about that"

IS this a symptom of bipolar? Is CBT a way to deal with? do you have any weblinks you could refer me too?

Thanks heaps.
6 Responses
1308134 tn?1295187619
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
I have not seen this as a symptom of mania, but it certainly fits with what we know of the brain changes that take place with mania - essentially there is a reduction in self monitoring for mistakes and errors (the part of the brain that performs that function has reduced activity on functional brain scans in mania).
In general there are not that many treatments other than medications that help with mania - but one that can be useful is mindfulness practice (which you have to begin before you develop mania) which can enhance your brain's ability to be self aware.
Good luck!
Avatar universal
Why dont you consult a doctor???
Avatar universal
huh?

I was just curious and asked someone online re. this which I will raise with my (various) doctors. Back off!! or say something constructive.
Avatar universal
I don't think the comment was meant to offend but rather to offer practical advice.

I found the question and answers interesting.  I can be somewhat dishonest when I am unwell.  An example of this would be like last week when I saw my doctor.  He asked if I had any medication left.  I said no.  I actually had two tablets.  Sounds trivial.  Anyway, based on the answers here I wonder if that is not my healthy and unhealthy parts warring with each other.  I guess when there is so much chaos and confusion anything is bound to come out.  It leaves me feeling confused and ashamed afterwards.

It was a new way for me to look at things.  The mindfulness sounds like a useful skill/ tool to have too.  I might look into my decision making processes too.

I think psychotherapy would be useful to help with insights, etc.

Thank you for the posts.
Avatar universal
I guess I reacted to the number of ???? like doh!

Psychotherapy is certainly opening a whole "can of worms" for me (but it's very helpful too) but the lying does seem to be more of a manic /physical thing for me, rather than an actual choice...
Avatar universal
Discussing it with a doctor (or health professional) was good advice.
People use question marks all the time for various things.  I know I use them  a lot outside what most people would consider good grammar.

I find that when I feel or react strongly to something someone has written it is a good opportunity to look at what has triggered it or what is the underlying emotion.  It can teach you a lot about yourself.

I too have found therapy both beneficial and painful.

I haven't really looked at my antisocial behavior (my lying or lying by omission).  I don't perceive it as being an actual choice -not something I feel in control of or do deliberately.  I'm sure this isn't making me sound like a very honorable person when I actually value honestly and integrity very highly.

It sounds like it could be from a deficit in self-regulation.  I'm going with that for now anyway.

I think making poor decisions can be disempowering.  This doesn't help when one is already unwell.

I think the doctor had a good explanation and equally good advice.

Good luck with therapy.  I hope you get some resolution on this.
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