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I have multiple sclerosis for the last 8 years and I been very well control with Copaxone Inj, however for the last year I been under a lot of emotional estress; in fact the last MRI show a new lession that was active. Yesterday afternoon I saw a floted on my L eye in the lower lef coner and I still have it, everytime I move my eye its there. Is that means that perhaps the MS have worsen?
3 Responses
1396846 tn?1332463110
Hi Ali23771,

It could just mean that you are in a relapse. I hope that is all it is and soon the symptoms will reside. Have you contacted your neuro about the new symptoms? Maybe he/she can add to what is going on.

Good Luck,
Paula
667078 tn?1316004535
Floaters do not necessarily mean MS. I am 47 and have had them for years do to good old aging. I do not know your history. If you have not seen an opthamologist in awhile it could not hurt MS or no MS. If you are concerned you can bring it up to your Neurologist. Not being a medical professional I would hate to give you the wrong advice.

Alex
1453990 tn?1329235026
Floaters are natural objects in the eye. I have several in each eye that the ophthalmologist has been able to see for the last 25 years.  They are so common, Wikipedia has an entry for them:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floater

Bob
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