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18, Multiple Sclerosis?

I'm only 18, male, but I think I may have Multiple Sclerosis. I don't usually jump to conclusions but I don't know how else to explain this. My symptoms include:

Depression
Panic/anxiety attacks
Muscle spasms
Weird episodes where I jerk and twitch and I feel like I can't control my body even though I can?
(New) I have recently started having a sudden numbness, like "falling asleep", or "pins and needles" in my feet. It's not from sitting on them, it comes to one or the other very rapidly and it's so intense I cannot stand up or walk.
Along with the twitching, it's not just in episodes, it's everyday. I have this urge to contort myself and I pop my knee caps, bend my neck very far, bend my spine far back, head movements, and more.
My fingers shake alot, as do my toes
I cannot concentrate with my eyes (I also have had very very poor eye sight since childhood)
I have bouts of fatigue that may or may not be from malnutrition
Sometimes I get dizzy
When I get up to move around my vision goes completely white/gray. It has done this since around 13-14 but it has increased.
My depression goes to episodes where I have an uncontrollable urge to commit suicide, and the most recent was three days ago. I was able to calm myself and purge the pills that I had consumed but it happens often.

I know it sounds rather ridiculous but I have had very severe depression for a long time, probably 5-6 years. I cannot concentrate on much at all, and feel weak. It probably sounds ridiculous that I'm 18 and I think I have MS, but I am just trying to find an answer.

I am also a bulimic, but I don't really binge I just throw up anything I eat. I feel incredibly uncomfortable with food inside of me and have terrible body image issues.

Thankyou!
3 Responses
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382218 tn?1341181487
Many of the symptoms you describe could be from malnutrition.  I think that would first need to be eliminated as a possible cause before looking to other possibilities.  Eating disorders can seriously mess with your functioning as youprobably already know.  See your doctor and be completely candid about your symptoms including the purging.  S/he needs to know everything in order to assess your condition.
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Avatar universal
I do agree however most if not all have been around since before my eating disorder started. I did read that MS can cause eating disorders. Thankyou for your help!
Helpful - 0
352007 tn?1372857881
Your depression is something that is being treated right now correct? What medication(s) are you on to treat the depression? I would assume a diagnosis of bulimia is something a doctor diagnosed you with and not yourself?

With these two diseases you mentioned along with your psychical symptoms, I am assuming that you have psychological, psychiatric and primary medical attention?

Nothing sounds ridiculous here and I would like to welcome you  to the forums.  I think you should discuss your concerns and symptoms with your primary doctor as well as psychologist/psychiatrist.  This way, there's no second guessing from us, but getting the care you need.

I wish you much luck and perhaps they can do some blood work, (chemistry to check for electrolytes, B12 deficiencty, thyroid, etc etc).

Lisa

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