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580765 tn?1274919360

Electrical pain in the neck

Does anyone have- what I can only explain as- electrical surges in their neck?  It feels like the sharp electrical pain that you get when you turn your head quickly, but lately I have been having it sitting still and more frequently- sometimes nonstop for several minutes- hours.  I am on a doctor strike right now, and treat it with ibuprophen, but am just curious if any of you all get this sensation.
5 Responses
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335728 tn?1331414412
Hey Crystal...how are you doing today?  Glad to have you back honey!  I have copied the definition for Lhermitte's Sign as follows:

Lhermitte's Sign, sometimes called the Barber Chair phenomenon, is an electrical sensation that runs down the back and into the limbs, and is produced by bending the neck forward.

Associated conditions

The sign suggests a lesion of the dorsal columns of the cervical cord or of the caudal medulla. Although often considered a classic finding in multiple sclerosis, it can be caused by a number of conditions, including Behçet's disease,[1] trauma, radiation myelopathy,[2] vitamin B12 deficiency (subacute combined degeneration), and compression of the spinal cord in the neck from any cause such as cervical spondylosis, disc herniation, tumor, and Arnold-Chiari malformation. Lhermitte's Sign may also appear during or following high dose chemotherapy. [3]

This is the Wikipedia definition of this "phenomenon" and actually there are quite a few people on there that have it...but not me...but I am sure you are going to get some more responses from people that do suffer from this.  I hope this is some help to you and perhaps you can get further information if you google Lhermitte's sign ok?

Lots of Hugs,

Rena
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
I have had 4 episodes of unexplained symptoms which began in 2001 and have had test results that are similar to yours including the elevated proteins in my 2001 episode.

There are many folks on this board who are much more knowledgeble, so I will defer to them regarding ideas.

Anyway, you are not alone.   There are many limbolanders, without diagnosis, who reside on this forum.    The forum is chock full of knowledgeable, experienced and compassionate people.

Richard
OperaMBA
Helpful - 0
609135 tn?1223305848
I think what Rena posted is very informative and please know that just as Richard stated, you are not alone an the forum is full of knowledgeable people who want to help. This is a  world where you are always welcome.

Hugs, Susanne
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
In reading literature on MS one of the symptoms is a stabbing sensation that can occur anywhere in your body.  I have recently experienced it behind both knees.  Just like a needle stabbing or poking at the back of my knees then it goes away.

After seeing numerous doctors I have really come to the conclusion that they are practicing medicine....tc
Helpful - 0
293157 tn?1285873439
Hi there... I get electrical shock feelings in other parts of my arms legs...but havn't had it in my back...I have felt zapped down my spine feelings.. and the needle stabbing behind my knees I get quite often... I don't understand why I get these...

not yet Dx so, ??  take care and nice to hear from you

wobbly
undx
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