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Avatar universal

Feeling EMPOWERED and it only took a little independence

I made it to Florida.  Took about 18 hours with a car full of kids and following my sister, but I did it!

I drove the whole way FROM CONNECTICUT with a stop in NC.

I say I am empowered because a week ago I was feeling so sorry for myself.
I am not diagnosed and the ms specialist is giving me the lesions aren't big enough [email protected]&[email protected]

I was sitting round the house thinking I couldn't do anything because I was so disabled.
Don't get me wrong, physically I am the same, but I just decided that I am not going to let my physical issues
Stop me from doing anything.

I stopped often, took my Concerta for my cognitive [email protected] qnd used cruise control to keep my legs moving.
Tips I got from the forum.  Sun glasses also made a huge difference.

So rather than having to ait for my husband to haves the time to take me, I packed up the kids and did it myself.

Hooray for me.  Don't worry, I won't break my hand patting myself on the back.

Thanks for giving me the great tips.

Kerri
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Avatar universal
Yayyyyy!!!!  I completely understand how you feel. You can do things on your own. We are not going to be pushed down by this disease. Have a fantastic time in FL.

Take care!!
Kristi
Helpful - 0
1394601 tn?1328032308
Kerri, I think it was because my husband didn't enjoy being around children until they were civilized (about seventeen or so) that I was able to stay so active for so many years longer than many.  We camped, canoed, took long road trips to National Parks to Washington, DC to California to Florida...My sons learned by ten how to set up their own tent..no set up?...They slept on the van floor which took away from their experience.  I only had to refuse once, the next trip DONE first day..lol

Enjoy those kids.  They will keep you motivated and moving.
Helpful - 0
338416 tn?1420045702
Thumbs up!  It's always reassuring to know you can still do stuff yourself.  I just started driving again after a year off - I feel like I'm cognitively more aware, and my legs are behaving better.
Helpful - 0
667078 tn?1316000935
How wonderful. I could not have done that. I had trouble driving 20 minutes today. You rock.

Alex
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Thanks everyone.  I'm taking it a day at a time!
Helpful - 0
1466984 tn?1310560608
Great news and good for you!  You have empowered yourself - a good reminder to me for sure.  Have a great time!
Carol
Helpful - 0
382218 tn?1341181487
That is a great accomplishment and I'm glad you feel good about yourself, you should!  Sounds like a character building experience to me.  

And not only do such endeavours help to build self-esteem, but they're good for your brain.  There is much research into neuroplasticity that confirms that doing something new - eg: walking or driving a different route to work; learning a new language - or, say, driving to Florida on your own - actually creates new pathways in your brain and improves cognitive function.  So in taking on this challenge, you've actually made yourself smarter!

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"You must do the thing you think you cannot do."
Eleanor Roosevelt
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