Aa
Aa
A
A
A
Close
Avatar universal

Hand paralysis in sleep, no tingling

Hello to all. I am 25yo female and for more than a year i experience muscle twitching everywhere in my body every day. I also have ulnar nerve syndrome on my hands so when i sleep my hand occasionally gets numb with a tingling sensation, but i shake it and comes back quickly. One time though i was sleeping and woke up frightened, seeing my right hand paralysed. I couldn't move it at all from elbow to fingers for about 15sec and it just came back without the normal tingling sensation. I did a brain MRI wich showed nothing pathological. But still this paralysed hand from elbow to fingers got me really scared. It only happened once but i would like to ask if it could be MS..?
5 Responses
987762 tn?1331027953
COMMUNITY LEADER
Hi and welcome,

There is no reason for you to be concerned about a neurological condition like MS, MS doesn't cause all over body twitching, or tingling in peripheral limbs that you can shake out. If you experienced paralysis in your arm that lasted only a few seconds after waking, it's unlikely to be anything more than numbness causes by the positioning of the limb during sleep.

Hope that helps.....JJ
1 Comments
Thank you for your answer. I must say though that in the brain MRI something like "lesions" were shown on my frontal lobe, but not pathological, even after the intravenous fluid they gave me.  I cannot find the term in english since i am greek. I find "Spotted outbreakes" on Google translate. Are these lesions too? And can lesions be benign?
987762 tn?1331027953
COMMUNITY LEADER
Hi again,

I have to assume what your talking about....spots on your MRI are technically lesions, although typically most micro or tiny ones 1-3mm in size are non specific ischemic micro vascular lesions and are silent, as in not pathological.

The frontal lobe is a common lesions location and can be associated with things like migraines, hypertension, thyroid conditions, head bumps or trauma, some psychiatric disorders eg major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder etc but keep in mind that having some tiny lesions is not necessarily something that's abnormal or to do with diseases, so whilst it may seem significant or possibly a bad thing, it's usually not.....

Hope that helps......JJ  
  
Avatar universal
Hello again and thank you for your answer. It really helped me. I remember having bad headaches days before the MRI and during the MRI. Could lesion happen because of that?
I hope all the best for you!
987762 tn?1331027953
COMMUNITY LEADER
If you have a medical history of migraines or hypertension headaches, it's possible for non-specific lesions to be related to either condition but I wouldn't think general or stress headaches for a few days leading up to having an MRI would cause micro vascular lesions.

Keeping in mind that the issues you described originally, to me seem more consistent with circulation issues from sleep positioning, which usually cause seconds of uncomfortable sensation which resolves upon movement, so from my perspective it's just as possible that you've been overly worrying about your health and what was seen on your MRI was completely normal...

Hope that helps......JJ
Avatar universal
I have migraines for 8 years but they occur very rarely. My mom has them too. Thank you so much for your help and answers on the subject. I will go to a neuro to show my MRI results next month. But as i keep searching the internet i can't find anything benign associated to brain lesions except ms.. Be well and thank you a lot again!
Have an Answer?

You are reading content posted in the Multiple Sclerosis Community

Top Neurology Answerers
987762 tn?1331027953
Australia
5265383 tn?1483808356
ON
1756321 tn?1547095325
Queensland, Australia
1780921 tn?1499301793
Queen Creek, AZ
Learn About Top Answerers
Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
Find out how beta-blocker eye drops show promising results for acute migraine relief.
In this special Missouri Medicine report, doctors examine advances in diagnosis and treatment of this devastating and costly neurodegenerative disease.
Here are 12 simple – and fun! – ways to boost your brainpower.
Discover some of the causes of dizziness and how to treat it.
Discover the common causes of headaches and how to treat headache pain.
Two of the largest studies on Alzheimer’s have yielded new clues about the disease