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645390 tn?1338558977

Just returned from Primary care doc...

Ok, my doc came in and I told him I was there for my horrible face pain. He knows I have had that in the past, because I thought I had an ear infection at times in the past with this pain. I just never had it this painful. He had a student with him, so gave me a thorough exam. (not that he doesn't always, but was showing him how to do a basic neuro exam). He said my eyes aren't tracking and my feet go down? when doing some type of test on the bottom of them, and they should go up? My relflexes are way too quick, (although he said that could still be from my neck). I told him I am not seeing well, limping, numbness, pain etc. Basically the exam was very abnormal. I told him my surgeon (2 herniated discs in cervical spine were operated on Jan 09), doesn't think any of these symptoms have to do with my neck. My neurologist thinks they do, and are left over from my cervical myalopathy. My primary care doc agrees with the surgeon, and is certain I have MS. He says the MRI notes says MS is a possibility, and all my exam and history point to MS. He asked me what the neuros plan is. I told him she wants me to get another MRI in May. He wants to know what she is waiting until May for. I told him that is 6 months since that last MRI. He was angry, saying this is ridiculous. I should not go back to that neuro and he set me up for an MRI this Monday. He says it is time to get more aggresive, and get to the bottom of this. I agree wholeheartedly. He has been my doc for almost 10 years, so can "see" me and "sees" what is happening with my body.

So that is the latest, guess it is good that it is moving forward. The thought of starting all over with a new neurologist is just frustrating to me, but I need to do that. Hopefully he will send me to a good one if needed. He also told me to take it easier, and see about cutting back at work. Lulu was right with this...

Thanks for listening,
Michelle
13 Responses
572651 tn?1531002957
Wow! That was a great visit - but was he able to do anything for the facial pain?  Pain first, dx you can keep working on.  

It only makes sense to work part time right now - see if you can broker a deal with your employer.  

I'm glad to read you are on top of this with your excellent PCP.

all ears,
Lulu
Avatar universal
I'm so glad your primary doc is great. Hang on to him!

Yes, it's frustrating to start over with a new neuro, but you do have to. Your current one is ridiculous. To save time in this process, make sure you have records of all your test results, and have all your actual MRI images. Take these to your new neuro, along with a brief timeline of your symptoms. I'm sure your PCP will help with the information-gathering if need be.

Whatever is wrong with you, you seem just too ill to work at your current pace. Maybe you can't work at all. Of course, try to go part-time and see how that works out.

If at all possible, have your husband go with you to see the new neuro, and he should at least talk to your PCP soon. It's too much for you to have to try to function normally when you just can't, and your husband needs to understand this. Please work on this aspect of things because it's clearly a major stressor and only makes things worse.

ess
645390 tn?1338558977
Ladies, you are the best...I didn't even think to ask about the meds. I just called and asked the office that question. To continue with the Trileptal or get a different one. They will get back to me today.

I will also mention to my husband about going with me to the doc. My MRI is Monday and I am seeing my doc the following week. (he is on vacation next week). I will ask my husband to come with me to the PCP at that visit. Good idea.

I don't know what I would do without this board at the moment. It is truly a life-saver for me.

Thanks so much,
Michelle
Avatar universal
Hi,

I may be way off base with this one.  I suffered with face pain, got the run around between my family doc and ENT,  My dentist dx'ed me with a blocked salivary gland
and he was correct.  Fluid backs up.  This pain was nasty

He explained to me that a dentist gets a lot more education about the face and head then some docs Go figure ,  Just a shot in the dark,  sometimes something sour will release the plug

Hope this may help                             Linda
645390 tn?1338558977
Where in your face did it hurt? Mine is between my upper cheek bone and goes towards my ear and nose, and then it hurts above that going towards my eye. It primarily is the "skin" that hurts, doesn't feel deep, just like the surface is on fire.and it shoots at times...that might sound strange, but that is the feeling of it.  Even the air can "hurt" it. Does that sound like what you had?
Thanks,
Michelle
Avatar universal
It has been so long, ago, i can't remember.

All I can remember was the pain was horrible and shot up to my ear and side
of the face  I thought I would go nuts.   The dentist ordered a full mouth x ray even though
there was nothing wrong with my teeth.

It broke the day before I had the full mouth x-rayt     I felt a pop. a few pieces on sand came out from under my tongue and all this clear fluid released   The pain left instantly

I had ever in my life heard og a blocked salivary gland  Hope this helps  Linda
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