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MRI Scan findings

This is the MRI scan

There are numerous T2 and FLAIR hyperintense foci seen in the right periventricular white matter, both cerebral hemispheres white matter more to the right side, corpus callosum and in the left middle cerebellar peduncle, the one in the right periventricular white matter shoes perpendicular orientation to the callososeptal interface, compared to the old MRI (was taken about a year ago), the left cerebral peduncle lesion is more obvious on this exam, no significant interval changes in the rest of the bright spots, findings are suggestive of demyelinating disease like multiple sclerosis, clinical correlation and follow-up MRI with contrast are recommended for better evaluation. The possibility of ischaemic vasculopathy is felt less likely. The ventricles are normal in size and position. There is no evidence of acute or chronic infarct, intracranial hemorrhage, extraaxial fluid collection, or mass effect. There is no cerebellar tonsillar herniation. Expected arterial flow-voids are present. The paranasal sinuses, mastoid air cells, and middle ears are clear. No significant osseous or scalp lesions are identified.

Please can you tell me your impression on this matter, the severe level of it and what are the side effects that may occur. I hope you can give a clear answer and please simplify it for me, but keep all the important details in it. i hope you can reply ASAP. Wish you a good day.
6 Responses
338416 tn?1420049302
While it's tempting to look at the MRI and try to track down your deficits based upon the lesion activity, don't bother. Visible lesion activity in the brain compared to actual symptoms rarely matches up. All I can tell you is that your lesion load is typical for MS.

The only thing I've noticed over the years is that for patients with an MRI with many lesions, the MS tends to be less active or debilitating. Patients with more symptoms tend to have an MRI with few lesions.
5112396 tn?1378021583
We're just patients. Your MRI is not normal, but other than that it's best discussed with your neurologist.
Avatar universal
Can someone interpret this?

XAMINATION PERFORMED: MRI brain without and with contrast

CLINICAL DATA: Headache.

TECHNIQUE: T1, T2, diffusion-weighted imaging, SWI, postcontrast T1, including MPRAGE.

CONTRAST: 5 mL of Gadavist intravenous contrast was administered.

COMPARISON: None.

FINDINGS:

The brain parenchyma has normal signal characteristics. The ventricles are normal in size and position. There is no evidence of acute infarct, intracranial hematoma, extraaxial fluid collection, or mass effect. There is no cerebellar tonsillar herniation. Expected arterial flow-voids are present. No abnormal enhancement.

The paranasal sinuses, mastoid air cells, and middle ears are clear. The orbital contents are within normal limits. No significant osseous or scalp lesions are identified.
Avatar universal
This describes a perfectly normal brain.

ess
667078 tn?1316004535
No test rules MS in or out. The neurologist has to look at your history, neurological exam, symptoms and do more tests to diagnose MS. It can often take awhile. Neurologists like to follow you over time.

Alex
1831849 tn?1383231992
I agree with ess. Sounds like a text book description of a normal brain.

Kyle
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