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MS progression or pre heart attack/stroke?

for the last couple months or so my right side has gotten weak to the point of falling after a few steps and not good grasp.  I have a localized pain in the right chest but also it feels like an elephant sitting on me steady.a recurring pain in the left arm.  Also a steady weight/pressure over the sternum area and from side to side.
Now when I stand I get the tunnel vision, light headed thing but know I also get that when I yawn, stretch turn around to fast or climb  more than two steps.   I also have noticed myself yawning constantly and taking deep breaths. Most times I have acute ringing in ears like when your in a room devoid of sound for any length of time.  I have also done in home blood pressure monitoring and when spaciest I am running about 170/100 and ten later it is 115/82 and then right back to 172/101.  With no no exertion or stress between readings.
I'm confused and my neuro left practice and went to Admin.  My primary left town and IF you can find a DR. taking new Patients  They still wont take my insurance and the ones that do take my insurance(Medicaid) they are NOT taking new patients.  And of course our local hospital is a teaching Hospital or sum such I have been in ER 4 times, they say my pressure is high but don't prescribe anything and want me to see my Primary WHICH I DONT HAVE!  
I don't mean to yell but I am extremely frustrated as this has been going on for about 3 yrs...( I know, quite awhile that nobody is taking new patients)
So Any insight is gladly welcomed and much appreciated
Thank You,
lostfuzzy1
4 Responses
1831849 tn?1383228392
Hi LF -  Welcome to our group.

First things first. If your resting blood pressure is 170/100 then you have high blood pressure, according to the American Heart Association (http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/HighBloodPressure/AboutHighBloodPressure/Understanding-Blood-Pressure-Readings_UCM_301764_Article.jsp)

Before anything else you should address this situation. I am not a doctor, and am unfamiliar with the symptoms of high blood pressure, but you should address it. When your blood pressure is under control it will be easier to identify and address remaining symptoms.

Just one man's opinion.

Kyle
6881121 tn?1392830788
Not a doctor, but I was a Paramedic... MS or not, sustained high blood pressures, especially resting pressures such as you have documented are going to cause damage to almost every end-organ/body system. Lungs, heart, kidneys, eyes are all at risk. You must find an MD, even if it is a clinic, to have a workup.
Avatar universal
it is strange though that your BP is so transient without any meds being taken. You definitely need to find a clinic or primary physician of some sort, like the others have stated.
Avatar universal
Thank you for your opinion and information.  It is welcomed and appreciated.  
As I stated I am without a PCP but I will double my efforts and radius of potential Clinics/Dr.s.  I live in a town of about 60K so I will have to try Vancouver which is 45 miles away.  The general consensus is I must find out what or why it is fluctuating so much before the other symptoms are addressed.
So, thank you again,
Barb  aka   lostfuzzy1
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