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lesions

Hi.  They found aesion on my brain in 2009 I was having balance issues,and fell. Spinal tap negative . Repeat mri 2011 no change .  Both mris had contrast .   Now I have the balance issue and numbness and tingling every where. Worse in feet and hands finger tips feel numb .  Mri with contrast shows new small lesions ..my neurogist is new he said lesions are  normal at my age 56 and thats not whats,causing my issues. The mri report says demyliniation should be included in diagnosis.  Dr says No spinal tap needed.  . Im confused .  Just had emgs waiting on those results .
9 Responses
5112396 tn?1378021583
Because you describe it as 'numbness and tingling everywhere', that seems more like peripheral neuropathy than MS. MS can't really present all-over simultaneous symptoms as the lesions that cause our symptoms are located in specific spots of the brain or spinal cord.

Your EMG results should give a better indication if peripheral neuropathy is likely. Your report may have actually stated that demyelination should be included in the *differential diagnosis*. The 'differentials' are the collection of 'might-be causes' for MRI findings. It's not the same as a diagnosis.
987762 tn?1331031553
COMMUNITY LEADER
Hi and welcome,

I have to agree with immi, and although you haven't quoted your MRI findings of the lesion location(s), or if you have any neurological 'clinical' abnormal test results (neurologist physical tests), or if the lesions actually enhanced with contrast, or if you have any diagnosed medical conditions that otherwise might account for your sympotms etc.....it would be highly unlikely for a neurological condition like MS, to actually cause any symptom to be all over the body and or in all peripheral limbs.

Keep in mind that neurological conditions like MS, have a lot of associated symptoms because MS effects the central nervous system and there are many other medical conditions, that also cause some of the same or very similar symptoms. I would think from what you've mentioned, that you may be dealing with a condition that more commonly effects the peripheral nervous system eg structural spinal issues, diabetes etc and hopefully your nerve test results and any other tests you'll end up having, will indicate which medical condition is your most likely.....

Cheers..........JJ


  
Avatar universal
No diabetes .   No lupus .  Herniated disks in lower back with previous,surgery herniated disks in neck also no surgery .  The new lesions show up with contrast.   They are on the subcortical  right frontal white matter . Says demyeliniation should be in the differental diagnosis. Also negative for lyme disease and no migraines either.  
Avatar universal
No diabetes .   No lupus .  Herniated disks in lower back with previous,surgery herniated disks in neck also no surgery .  The new lesions show up with contrast.   They are on the subcortical  right frontal white matter . Says demyeliniation should be in the differental diagnosis. Also negative for lyme disease and no migraines either.  
667078 tn?1316004535
If is doing EMGs he is still looking. You can always ask if this is not MS what could it be. Often when you change neurologists they want to watch you over time. It took me a year and half with my last neurologist before I was diagnosed. To be diagnosed with MS they want to see two attacks in different parts of the body at different time. My MS effects my right eye, my left foot, my right arm, headaches on the left, buzzing in my right foot.

Alex
987762 tn?1331031553
COMMUNITY LEADER
If you have degenerative discs in both upper and lower parts of your spine, that would 'possibly' account for why you have upper and lower limb symptoms, lower back degeneration can also cause balance issues too. This pubmed article http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17345822 is basic but from a reliable source.

It's actually not uncommon for "demyeliniation" to be mentioned with in the differential section of an MRI report, typically when 'subcortical' lesions are evident, the report will also mention ischemic vascular disease, migraine etc as well.

Lesions will still be visible on the MRI with or without contrast, so i'm not really sure what you mean when you say..."The new lesions show up with contrast.", sorry.

The main difference to the lesions when contrast is used, is that if there are any active demyelinating lesions at the time, the active lesions will enhance in brightness (light up like christmas tree lights) but non-enhancing lesions will still show up as bright spots. Does the MRI report specifically say these lesions 'enhance' with contrast or similar?    

Subcortical lesions as your neurologist mentioned, wouldn't actually cause your mentioned symptoms, basically that specific location in the brain is not responsible or related to those types of symptoms but they are associated with the spine, which would probably be the more likely explanation if that's the only location lesions were seen.

Cheers.......JJ
Avatar universal
Ive had tingling for 30 years goes away comes back eventually never this bad .   Way Before I had herniated disks.  I have pain and like electricity going up my arms and legs not down .  
Avatar universal
Emgs all normal .  No idea till I see dr what he might do next .  
Avatar universal
Its my thyroid causing these,issues thank you all for listening  
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