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Crimson Crescents

I have read numerous sources suggesting Crimson Crescents are attributed to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/ME.

However, it also is apparents in Mono patients, Lupus patients and Lyme patients.

I have a couple of questions to ask if anyone can help...

Does anyone have Crimson Crescents? (They are crimson red/purple discolorations either side of the dangly bit in your throat, just before your tonsils).

Can they occur in people with other neurological problems?

Can they occur in MS?

I noticed mine when I had a cold back in April, it was a particularly bad one, but when the cold went, I noticed while brushing my teeth one day that my throat was still red but not sore.  I went to my doctor and he took a swab stating that 1 tonsil was enlarged and suspected strep throat.  He gave me antibiotics but they did nothing.  The result came back a week later and it was negative for infection.  I have had the red throat ever since!  

I also have a swelling in one side of my throat and a swollen tonsil, on the same side I have a swollen gland just under my ear lobe, the swollen gland is not sore, and it varies from day to day, most days it is up, some days it goes down a bit.  I have been tested for Mono (Glandular Fever) and it was negative.  All my bloods are perfect apart from slight B12 deficiency, but I was struggling to eat when all this started and I lost weight.  

I have not been tested for Lupus this year, though when my initial problems began 2 yrs ago I DID have the test and it was negative.  They said I had CFS because I had extensive blood work which was all normal.  

Some doctors have said my throat looks normal, whilst others call it anxiety!  
7 Responses
Avatar universal
Yes, I have crimson crescents also.
I tested positive for Lyme Disease, fifteen years after being diagnosed with fibromyalgia syndrome.
I used to get terrible sore throats, colds and bronchitis every winter, but since I've been self-treating with supplements that support the immune system, I rarely get sick.

Some researchers think that tick borne infections may cause autoimmune reactions, Lupus, and Multiple Sclerosis, which might be why those people have Crimson Crescents.

Here is an article about ME that may interest you.

http://www.drmyhill.co.uk/article.cfm?id=361
Many people in the UK with ME/CFS who are now being tested privately are finding they are infected with bacteria from the Borrelia species that cause borreliosis or Lyme disease. continued....

Wishing you the best,
Carol
Avatar universal
Would Lyme cause neuro and heart symptoms?  Like Tachycardia?

Would it also cause painless swelling in the throat?
Avatar universal
Lyme bacteria invade the nerves and the organs.  Lyme is considered a neurological disease.

The Lyme bacteria use so much of the magnesium within our cells, that the enzyme processes are disrupted.
This can result in parasthesias (odd skin sensations), twitching, and cardiac arrhythmias.  

For reliable information, check the Canadian Lyme Foundation.
http://www.canlyme.com/patsymptoms.html

Best,
Carol
Avatar universal
Wouldn't Lyme show up in blood tests?  Like blood count, cultures etc...?

And, Lyme in the UK?

Is it possible?  I DID have some weird bites on me 2 yrs ago before the suspected CFS diagnosis.  I had 4 bites on my leg which came up when I was in the bath, they were big itchy lumps with bruising around them.
Avatar universal
Blood tests for Lyme are not reliable for several reasons.
The usual test is for antibodies to the Lyme bacteria.
Here in the U.S., physicians have been directed to do an ELISA test first for Lyme.
This test has been shown to miss half of the ~known~ cases of Lyme.

The Western Blot IgG and IgM tests are more sensitive, but they only test for antibodies to one to three varieties of the bacteria, depending on which lab does the test.  And there are many varieties of Borrellia for which no test has been developed yet.

There are also a number of other tick borne infections, such as Babesiosis, Ehrlichia, Bartonella, and mycoplasma.
See this for more info:  http://www.lymeinfo.net/coinfections.html

That site, LymeInfo.net, has a lot of good information. Click on the links across the top of the page.

Mode of transmission need not be ticks only.
These infections have been shown to be present in fleas, biting flies, and mosquitoes.

On another post, your husband mentioned that you have petechia.
This can be one of the symptoms of tick borne infection.
An infection with Bartonella can cause a skin lesion that looks similar to stretch marks.
Here is a page with Lyme rashes:  http://www.canlyme.com/rash.html

Yes, the UK has tick borne disease.
The Canadian Lyme Foundation has links to world wide support groups.  
There are several listed for the British Isles.
http://www.canlyme.com/links.html

Carol


Avatar universal
You mentioned that you have anxiety.
This does fit the pattern of symptoms for neurological Lyme infection.

Distinct pattern of cognitive impairment noted in study of Lyme patients
http://www.angelfire.com/biz/romarkaraoke/Lymetim1.html


Carol


Avatar universal
There is an extensive and comprehensive source of Lyme information with diagnostic info and treatment protocols to be found at International Lyme and Associated Diseases Study group, or ILADS.  I so very strongly reco checking it out.  It is extremely helpful.
Pam M.





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