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Avatar universal

Neurology

I'm a 53 y/o male.

I've been fighting this problem for 4+ years and doctors can't find anything.

Both feet, on the bottom sides, when I walk, feels like blisters under the skin (entire bottom sides).
You can't feel anything by touching the external skin. My feet usually swell and tingle most of the time.
I also get occasional burning sensations.

I've been to medical doctors, neurologists, podiatry, reflexologist, chiropractors, but they don't have a clue.

Doctors have given me various medications, X-Rays, but the problem continues to get worse.
I wear Dr Schols feet pads in my shoes, but only slightly helps with the pain.

I was wondering if you could give me any suggestions?

Thanks

Stan Miller
6 Responses
Avatar universal
Sounds just like peripheral neuropathy to me.  I have it.  At first it came from a bad back, I had neuropathy just a little in one foot and up into my lower leg, to where I couldn't feel those pins they stick in me.  It was in the sole of my foot on the side, had the same swelling as you, stingy, and redness, pain.  Well, then I had chemotherapy, and that can induce neuropathy in the hands and feet, and after a year it subsided in my hands mostly, but my feet are still a pretty big problem, which now they will be that way for good.  Mine additionally feels numb, like cotton is wrapped around my toes, but I do have a pretty bad kind.  But gosh, it hurts SO bad to walk on them.

Now, peripheral neuropathy can be caused by a variety of things, including the ones I just mentioned, plus diabetes, poor circulation, injury, and other stuff.  So, since you've been thru the mill with docs, I won't suggest this test or that diagnosis, but at least have them do a blood draw and find out what your sugars are, to rule out diabetes, becuz you don't want that one to get away from you.  They should also scan your foot and your lower back.  

Three things that can help your feet, becuz unless they can find a cause and fix that, you're stuck with it.  (1)  You've said you have tried meds, but since they apparently haven't given you relief, whomever is your most cooperative doc on that issue, he should offer you Lyrica (a cousin to Neurontin, only better), it's not an opiate so docs will usually give freely, and it should be increased several times in the first month or two.  Seems like Tramadol is another non-opiate that kills pain.  And then there is the opiates, even Tylenol-Codeine #3 is better than nothing.  So, give more meds a try.  My feet hurt all the time, but by the time my morning doses kick in, they feel much more tolerable, I can kind of hobble around fairly well.

(2) At some point every day, with your socks on, rub those feet out really good, squeeze, push hard, get every toe, use the sock material as a rubbing assistant, work them over good.  (3)  When I used to work, when I came home, I'd go sit on the side of the tub and run coolish water over my feet until I got tired of sitting there.  Both those last two things are somewhat temporary in help, and will never make it all stop.  Nothing will.

I wound up buying shoes several sizes larger than what I used to wear, sure felt a lot better, altho there is something to be said for "support."  There are shoes other than running shoes, that are designed to look nice but provide lots of arch support and layers of spongy material.  Lastly, visit a website where neuropathy is all they talk about, and might be some even better tips on there for how to deal with this thing.  I mean, compared to most of my other physical limitations, I'm not too concerned with my feet, so I've just accepted it.  But I don't HAVE to get up and stand on my feet all day and work anymore.  You do, I presume.  But still, hope my thoughts help you a little.
Avatar universal
Hello.  Thanks for your response. Very much appreciated.

I will do some reading on peripheral neuropathy.
The podiatrist I’m seeing had me get an MR. I’m waiting for the results.
He wants to see if my lower back pain is causing my problems.

The Neurologist I’m seeing, prescribed Lyrica about a year ago. It was causing me to be drowsy all the time, so had to stop using it. What do you believe it was doing for you?  Do you think it helped?

They tested my blood for diabetes, but a couple other folks have recommended this.
I have an appointment with my MD doctor next week and already planning to ask for another blood test.     I have a great MD doc and will give me anything I ask for, if in reason.

I’ve been wondering about having my feet scanned but the podiatrist and MD both said,
with the X-ray just done is not showing anything.  ????

I’m currently taking Neurontin and Mentax.
(L-mefolate-pyridox-mecobalamin – Generic)
I don’t see any improvement.
The Mentax is supposed to help with the nerves. (Strong multi vitamin)

I will try rubbing my feet as you have suggested.

I wear good shoes (Rockports) with the arch supports.

Yes, I’m on my feet for work.

I read where Vinegar is good for allot of things.  Do you think this would help soaking my feet in it, possibly adding Epsom Salt?

Thanks again for your information. I wish you the very best with your feet.
I can only hope mine will get better.
Avatar universal
Stan,
This sounds like neuropathy.
Have any of your doctors diagnosed that?
If they haven't, they are missing something.

Dr. Jacob Teitelbaum has lots of information about pain and neuropathy in his book,
Pain Free 1-2-3: A Proven Program for Eliminating Chronic Pain Now
http://www.amazon.com/Pain-Free-1-2-3-Jacob-Teitelbaum/dp/B001W52KLE/

Look at the reviews at Amazon.
Used copies are available.
You can click on "search inside this book" to view some of the information.

He has a website, End Fatigue.
http://www.endfatigue.com/site-map.html
Look around on the site, there is so much information.
He does have a line of products, but donates profits to a charity.
iHerb.com carries a number of his products at a discount.

Okay, I looked for the book notes on his site.
http://www.endfatigue.com/book_notes/Pf123_book_notes_overview.html

See -
Appendix A, section 2, Neuropathic pain.
Chapter 4:  Focusing on Nerve Pain.

He is very generous with his information, you can find all you need without having to buy the book.
Take a look at all that, and feel free to contact me if you want to discuss it further.

Carol
Avatar universal
Carol, I'm glad you brought that book to our attention and invited Stan to contact you.

Stan, the pain meds I take are for my back, but it just so happens to quiet my feet pain to a degree, as I said by midmorning they aren't as bad.  When I first took Lyrica, I was quiet drowsy and off-balance for the first few weeks too, but like a lot of side effects, it went away after a while.  Maybe your doc can up your dose of Neurontin?  Then I take the Tylenol-Codeine #3 as my other back pain pills, which in a few months my neuro is going to change that to probably Hydrocodone.  It's the two together that help me, I presume, becuz I was on both when my feet got peripheral neuropathy in them.  When I get low on meds or at the beginning of the day, my feet hurt a lot worse.  I like the idea of vinegar and salts in your foot soak.  Maybe there will be some herbs in that book Carol mentioned that you can put in there, too.  Maybe there's a numbing lotion out there somewhere that could help your feet, your doc may know of something if you can't find something in the pharmacy.  Yah, those Rockports are great, maybe you need to get a size larger?  Wish I could offer more help.  GG
Avatar universal
Hello
My doctors are saying and treating me for neuropathy.  Sad, but they literally don’t know what my problem is.
Thanks for the information on this pain book. At this point, I’ll try anything.
I’m a believer of alternative medicine and herbs. I’ll also check this website and see what they have available.
I’m currently taking Neurontin. Its probably helping, but I don’t see any improvement.
My podiatrist has had great success with Mentax, but not in my case. I’m to see him again in a couple weeks and see what he wants to try after getting my MRI results.
I know my doctor would prescribe Tylenol-Codeine #3  if I asked for it, but I use Naprosyn 500mg.
If you are having back pain, I recommend Naprosyn.  This is the same as Aleve, but stronger. This helps my back pain.  I also use Valerian. I order it from Wonder Labs in White House, TN. They are fantastic.
Hydrocodone – I’m not familiar with this one.  I just looked it up.  If it helps you, I will ask my MD about it. I’ll see him on the 31st.    I’m planning to try soaking them in the vinegar/Epsom salt this weekend.
In regards to pain, I do have pain, but its so aggravating when walking and feels like waking on large blisters.
I sincerely thank you for your help and comments.
Sm
Avatar universal
You were saying the Naprosyn "helps my back pain," so this suggests the likely origin of your peripheral neuropathy is because of your back!  That's where mine originally came from, which chemo made it worse.  All parts of my back arel tore up from a car wreck, and lumbar spine is very painful, as is thoracic.  But anyhow, lower back pain is a cause of peripheral neuropathy in the feet.  So, if you can get some treatment for your back, it's POSSIBLE your foot neuropathy will get rather better.  Usually they'll give you meds, like you're getting now, and they'll offer physical therapy, perhaps a back brace, that sort of moderate treatment.  If that doesn't work or control the discomfort, then surgery becomes an option, altho docs don't like that becuz of the high risk.  Sometimes they'll give various shots in the spine to kill the pain, you have to go back and get them every few months or so, might extend to your feet, and all this is IF your back is causing this.

I can tell you this.  If perchance you are on your feet most of the day AND if you are walking on concrete floors, then those floors should have rubber mats on them everywhere.  Concrete floors are hard on the back and feet.  I used to work Saturdays at a vet clinic as a kennel tech, of course the floors were concrete, and mats were few and far between.  At the end of working day, my feet were on fire and I could barely walk.  Wasn't much I could do about it, except give up my work with the dogs.  So, this may be something you might have to consider down the road, IF you are actually on concrete floors a lot, but mats help a lot.

You said you use Valerian, that's great.  I use something similar, tranquilizer pills, Klonopin, it's for my panic disorder from my car wreck.  I could not make it without them, becuz the pain really works me up.  Hydrocodone is a rather powerful opiate, whereas the Codeine #3 does not have the "pull" (addiction potential) that the other has.  Could be if you can get some Tyl-Codeine #3, a couple of those along with your Neurontin (see will he up the dose) ought to help a lot.  But honestly, unless I'm full-on with my meds, I almost cannot walk, and I'm not up all day working anymore either!

Cold helps nearly all pain, even headaches.  I hope your foot soaks help, gotta be cold!  And I should think any numbing herb in your water would help, too.  The main thing is to get this thing to where you can manage.  By the by, Neurontin is a cousin to Lyrica, but I couldn't tolerate Neurontin, but since you can, that's practically the same stuff, so it's good you have at least that.  Keep us posted.    
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