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1059772 tn?1286655190

multiple sclerosis symptoms

I am in the process of being evaluated for multiple sclerosis due to many white spots on my MRI and eye troubles.  I have a few things I have noticed for many years but didn't think much about until now:
I frequently shudder with a feeling of a chill for a few seconds at a time.
Occasionally, I space out for a moment and then come back sometimes in the middle of conversation.
I sometimes experience a very sharp stabbing pain in my abdomen that lasts for about 30 seconds.
My question is: should I mention these things to my neurologist or are these things that everyone experiences?
Thanks
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157832 tn?1221515779
Hi! I first wanted to say sorry for the things you are going through. I was diagnosed with MS in Aug of 07 after 10 years of symptoms w/o dx!! I think that you should definitely tell your neuro about the symptoms you are describing. Whether they relate or not doesnt necessarily matter, just that you are telling a doctor about them. He/she may think that they go together w/other symptoms or he/she may not. But its always better to tell than to not tell. With MS no 2 people experience the exact same things the exact same ways. It is a very tricky disease. I wish you the best :)

Donielle
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1059772 tn?1286655190
Thanks so much for your insights. I really appreciate it.

I hope you are doing well with it all.
skye
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710144 tn?1232989892
My daughter,like you was just diag.with MS. She also has these same systmptoms, But always let your dr know
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Avatar universal
Hi, I am currently for the second time in my life going through an evaluation for MS. I was in my early twenties when I had a foot drag, loss of right eye sight, protrusion on my brain. I was hospital for weeks. I did not get a diagnosis. I was also checked for a stroke. Physician told me that more than likely I had MS but could not give diagnosis. All systems went away within several months, except my right eye has nerve damage. That was approximately 30 years ago. To my knowledge I did not have a recurring episode. I had some numbness and tingling in my limbs but thought it was because of over exercising. No way did I think that these things were related to MS events! Now, I am being asked by a Nuerologist to start an injection therapy: take a spinal tap; I am researching which therapy; wanting a second opinion; and just trying to get a clear understanding in general. In the past, I have had several spinal taps and I want to wait on that. I remember a spinal tap being a painful experience and I am sure it has not changed. What are your thoughts on my story. Please respond and let me know.
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1059772 tn?1286655190
hi maartu:
after i wrote my post, i realized that there was a special forum just for MS issues (see the link below) maybe you want to write your post over there to get some better feedback.  I hadn't really given this disease much thought before a few weeks ago and now it seems to be omnipresent....  it takes so long to get it all figured out and the results of testing can be so inconclusive.  I've had a hard time keeping my head on straight the last couple weeks.
take care,
Skye

http://www.medhelp.org/forums/Multiple-Sclerosis-MS/show/322
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