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not sure what's happening to me

Yesterday around 3 pm I woke up from a nap. I stood up and immediately collapsed on the ground and started rolling around on the floor and convulsed for about 30 seconds. I was fully conscious and I have a vague memory of what happened. I was really freaked out and I slowly stood up. Within 2 seconds i collapsed again and my face slammed against the corner of my desk and i fell face first on the carpet. At this point i was crying and really scared. I crawled to a mirror and i stood up and saw a huge gash next to my lip and blood all over my face. I started to lose my vision and everything turned white. My hearing went and my head was throbbing. I felt like I was dying. I collapsed yet again cradling my head against the ground. I managed to crawl to a chair and sit. I called my mom and asked her to take me to the hospital, but there was a storm and she couldn't. After realizing that I lived on the third floor and I couldn't stand that I wouldn't be able to get down stairs I called 911. I had a hard time telling the operator what happened and where I lived. I couldn't remember very well. An ambulance took me to the hospital and they said my blood pressure was really low. Like 70/50. They gave me fluids. I got a head ct, chest xray, and an ekg. I tried to get up to go to the bathroom and managed to make it there. When I finished and stood up I started getting dizzy again and my senses started going and I called for help and they had to bring me a wheelchair. At this point I had a severe migraine as well. I also got 4 stitches for my face. Half the people I talked to while there said they thought I had a seizure and half the people said they didn't think I did. The doctor said all my tests were normal and there was nothing wrong. My blood pressure went back to normal and I got discharged with no real advice or medication and I still can barely make it across a room in my apartment without collapsing and loosing my vision and hearing which is accompanied by super bright, white tinted vision and severe tinnitus.I just crawl now. I cant even sit up straight. I have to recline. I'm making an appointment with a neurologist, but I don't know what to do until then. Does anyone have any idea what this could be?
2 Responses
620923 tn?1452915648

  Hi.....not being a Dr I could not speculate.....but suggest you go to your PCP and have more testing...look at your families medical history to help rule things out....so many things could be a root cause of this....and not knowing your history even a Dr could not speculate.....

See a Dr for more testing and let us know what you find out....

Things to look at...BP, POTS, ICP,......dehydration,.....etc.
1780921 tn?1499301793
Hi,
As Selma stated there are to many unknowns to say what you are facing right now. Does it sound like you are having seizures to me, no, but you are going to have to have a EEG done to officially rule it out.

I would like to recommend, that you buy a blood pressure machine and for you to record what your numbers are. I would take a reading in the morning and another one at night. When you go to your doctors appointment bring your results and let the doctor review them. Ask your doctor about possibly having a tilt table test performed.

And yes please keep us informed
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620923 tn?1452915648
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