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Ovarian Cancer Community
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alternative therapies

Hi.  I have recurrent ovarian cancer (Stge 4 epthelial).  Anyone aware of good alternative therapies for ovarian cancer?
7 Responses
Avatar universal
Alternative therapies, not recommended.  However adjunct or 'complimentary' therapies are widely used.  I have researched and believe in the following:

Maitake D-Fraction  
Coenzyme Q-10 (CoQ10)
Genistien & I3C  (Soy Isoflavones / Dark Green Vegetables)
Turmeric
Omega 3 (Fish Oil

I have some articles I've written on them on my website; access via my profile page on medhelp.  Let me know if you have any questions!
561476 tn?1220955776
I have a list of vitamins in my "notes" section. There good for D toxing.

There is no alternative treatment to Ovarian cancer that i'm aware of. There are vitamins we can take to help our bodies better fight the disease, but there not a cure.

398758 tn?1248220291
I agree with all of the above.  Let me add two more things:

1.  Limit sugar intake.  PT scans are used to locate sugar in the body--sugar which feeds cancer cells.

2.  Exercise.  Exercise burns sugar in our muscles.  

I'm taking many of the supplements listed above; I believe in CoQ 10 because I read that it *shouldn't* be used during chemo; apparently,  it protects the cells so well that it would prevent the chemo from doing its job!  

No cure, but plenty of things to make our bodies stronger to fight it all off. Best of luck.
Avatar universal
Look at CoQ10 again, I've written an article on it (compilation)...it actually helps with chemo and is actually recommended if taking a certain chemo to protect the heart :)
Avatar universal
For example: Maitake d-fraction is alternative method of treating cancer and also can be called complementary with chemo.
I am using large dose of Vit C intravenous, Maitake d-fraction and helixor. These three are alternative treatments and finally my Oncologist admited that I can use them synergistically with my single agent chemo Carbolpatin.But for the past long few months before my Chemo I was using them and my cancer was at bay..
So please do not say alternative terapies are not recomended.You are miseleading the person that is looking for answers. I have been studying alternative terapies since 2005 dx and I am confident they work too as mine did slow things down..
Avatar universal
I had been told that Genistien & Soy Isoflavones are not advised as they are 'plant eostrogens' and mimic our natural hormones and may 'fit' eostrogen receptors in tumours and thus feed the tumours. What do you think Alan? For me my tumour wan't e+ so okay but if it is true then I thought it may be worth a warning.

I think when deciding what alternative therapies to use to supplement and strengthen health people should consider during chemo seperately to before or following and after chemo. Your body needs different things at these different stages so a one option for all isn't sensible.

As per the sugar comment, excess sugar is never a good idea - it will be stored as fat and upset your insulin cycle and add strain on your body. Every cell in your body normal healthy cells and cancer cells alike uses glycogen as energy source. As your body uses glycogen that is available in your blood (converted with/via insulin from sugar and ANY  energy source you eat-fat, complex carbohydrate,fat,protein) glycogen is replaced in your blood either from food or if you haven't enough from stored fat and protein. Therefore depleting your body of sugar while eating any other energy source has no impact on 'starving' the tumours of sugar. PET scans take advantage of the fact that cells in tumours are replicating quickly and therefore are using more energy and therefore using glycogen at a higher rate than other cells. There is a lot of information about the energy cycle in the body that will say it better than me.
This 'sugar feeds cancer' thing comes up regularly and typically leads to alot of guilt and it just really gets me. I am from a chemistry background and have studied humon biochemistry, so it is one of those red rags for me that get me going, so I apoligise for rambling.
Avatar universal
Sure I understand that, Genistein (an isoflavone of soy) is considered a 'weak' estrogen and it's assumed that's why it's important in cancer treatment.  For instance, on ER (Estrogen Receptors) it will 'bind' to them instead of allowing more, stronger, human estrogren from binding to it...thus reducing the effect of estrogen on the cancer and stopping it's use of estrogen as a 'power' source.

For instance, Phenoxodiol (which is essentially a slightly tweaked version of Genistein) is in Phase III FDA trials for ovarian cancer to chemosensitize platinum resistant ovarian cancer...there are no such estrogen warnings for this drug (that I've seen at least) despite it being the same thing (note:  like I said it's tweaked to be more receptive to cancer but is still Genistein...sorta).

That being said...there are no clear cut answers in cancer treatment...even chemotherapy is an iffy proposition...it's success rate is never glamorous in advanced cancers.  However, for Genistein (going back to that topic) there is at least one report on ovarian cancer where a woman took it (part of a fermented soy drink) and was able to stabalize her CA-125 (even though chemo wasn't working for her anymore) and after quite a few months she went back on chemo with positive results (possibly because she chemosensitized her cancer).  There is a link to that report on pubmed via my article on my site (link on my profile page).

So...it essentially is up to you and your medical team on what you'd like to do as far as Genistien.  A good plan would be to be on the Phenoxodiol trial but I'm not sure how recruitment is right now and you may not even get it (I think you'll get carbo weekly as the 'placebo').

I have yet to write an article on the five supplements I suggest/like for ovarian cancer treament (will try to explain how each one affects cancer and works with chemo in a big picture type thing)...but the goal of treatment is being able to:  1) Survive chemotherapy (remember it's cytotoxic so you need to keep health, etc., in top shape) and 2) prevent cancer from adapting to the chemotherapy.  Those are the two major obstacles in conventional cancer treatment.  I think we have seen with Phenoxodiol (and several other former 'supplements' that are now getting into the mainstream drug pipeleine) that what was once called 'dangerous' to take by oncologists who never even attended nutrition class in med school are now mainstream drugs.  But, like anything, we'll have to wait and see how conventional medicine catches up with how humans have been doing it for quite some time prior to chemotherapy.

A final note, in the report I was talking about, the woman took a fermented soy drink which had high levels of Genestein and Danzien...both of which are suspected to work on cancer.  The drink is going to taste quite nasty (it's fermented soy) and is expensive.  Nobody knows if 'supplements' (pills, capsules) work any better but you can get the same or higher dosage that way.  

For example, a UCLA study using Genestien and DIM (from dark green vegetables) have shown to slow the metastasis of ovarian cancer.  It was preliminary in vitro research, but as they said:

"We think these compounds might slow or prevent the metastasis of breast and ovarian cancer, which would greatly increase the effectiveness of current treatments," UCLA graduate student Erin Hsu said at a meeting of the American Assn. for Cancer Research in Los Angeles.
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