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Hemorrhagic cyst, should I be worried?

down. Last Friday, out of nowhere, I started getting extremely bad lower abdominal pains that spread to my lower back as well. Ended up going to the ER, many blood tests, and a CT scan later, diagnosis; 3 cm left ovarian mass, with layering of dense material, most likely representing hemorrhagic cyst. After talking with the ER doctor, she assured me that the pain would go away in a few days. My problem is that I cannot stop worrying about ovarian cancer. I am 49, and my periods have been erratic for the past few years. Next month will be 1 whole year without a period so I guess that would make me officially menopausal. I know I shouldn’t be on the internet reading about this stuff, but it says menopausal women shouldn’t technically have cysts on their ovaries anymore because there is no ovulation. So that’s why I am worried. I did have a follow-up with my GYN the very following day and she saw the report and told me not to give it a second thought and basically told me “see you next year for your annual”! I guess the fact that she isn’t worries makes me feel better, but my health anxiety has taken over. Anyone else have any similar experience with ovarian cysts? What worries me even more is that I had a US last year and there were absolutely no cysts at all and now all of sudden a 3 cm cyst pops up out of nowhere.
3 Responses
207091 tn?1337709493
I have to say that I'm with you on the cyst and ovulation. Functional cysts happen with ovulation, so if you're not having periods, it's a really good sign that you aren't ovulating.

If you are ovulating, and haven't had an ablation or have some other reason why you wouldn't have a period, here's some info on cysts:

http://www.clevelandclinicmeded.com/medicalpubs/diseasemanagement/womens-health/ovarian-cysts/

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1110569015300157

https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/discussion/mayo-clinic-q-and-a-hemorrhagic-ovarian-cysts-typically-dont-have-impact-on-fertility/

You can call your doctor and ask about this. Does your doctor know that you haven't had a period in almost a year? That's important info to this, so if not, call and let her know.

Maybe this is a month you are going to get your period. You can wait a couple of weeks and see if you get one, and see if this resolves, or wait a few days and go back to your doctor if the pain isn't gone in a few days like the ER doc said.

In any case, stay on it. If you don't get better, go back.

Let us know what happens.
Avatar universal
COMMUNITY LEADER
I am sorry this has you so concerned. Ovarian cysts are more common after menopause than most people, including some doctors, realize. Most resolve on their own, no intervention needed. 3cm is small and hemorrhagic cysts are not a concern.

Unfortunately, many women undergo surgery unnecessarily for ovarian cysts and lose their ovary too versus just the cyst. We need our ovaries our whole life for every aspect of our health. That is also true of our other endocrine glands.
Avatar universal
Women of reproductive age with hemorrhagic cysts less than 5 cm do not require follow-up but hemorrhagic cysts greater than 5 cm warrant short-interval follow-up (6–12 weeks) with ultrasound to ensure resolution and exclude mimics such as endometrioma. Women in early postmenopause require short-interval follow-up (6–12 weeks) with ultrasound to ensure resolution. Women in late postmenopause should never have a hemorrhagic cyst; any cyst with such an appearance should be considered neoplastic and surgical evaluation should be considered.

Source: https://pubs.rsna.org/doi/10.1148/radiol.10100213
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