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XXX syndrome

Does anyone know anything about this or have kids or know kids with it?  Not sure what to make of the information on the internet.  
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7953414 tn?1400163530
Home ResourcesConditions Triple X syndrome
Triple X syndrome
Girls with this syndrome have three X chromosomes instead of two. This occurs in approximately 1 out of every 1000 female births; therefore, one girl is born with this syndrome almost every day in California.

Girls with triple X syndrome (or trisomy X) tend to be taller than expected compared to other members of their families and are otherwise normal in appearance. Mental retardation is not associated with triple X syndrome; however, IQ scores tend to be 15-20 points lower than their siblings. The tendency for these girls to have speech, language, and motor delays may contribute to difficulty in psychosocial adjustments, such as shyness and immaturity, particularly during adolescence. There appears to be an increased risk for decreased self-esteem and self-confidence, but there is considerable variation within the group, and precise predictions are not possible. Sexual function, genitalia, and fertility are all normal, and studies show that their children are not at significantly increased risk for chromosome abnormalities.

Most affected women go through their entire lives without knowing they have an extra X chromosome. This syndrome is usually identified through prenatal diagnosis because girls with triple X syndrome are physically similar to girls with normal chromosomes.I'm taking a bio class and we just
went over genetics. Pretty much a baby girl that has xxx, has an extra chromosome in her cells. See, idk if i know anyone like that because the don't look much different than normal girls,  except they are taller. Anyway,  I found this on kaiser website:






7953414 tn?1400163530
I'm posting from my phone and when i pasted it, it pasted before my little individual comment blah :/. Anyway, the one above was from a government website. I'm trying to paste the kaiser one.
7953414 tn?1400163530
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Conditions
Home ResourcesConditions Triple X syndrome
Triple X syndrome
Girls with this syndrome have three X chromosomes instead of two. This occurs in approximately 1 out of every 1000 female births; therefore, one girl is born with this syndrome almost every day in California.

Girls with triple X syndrome (or trisomy X) tend to be taller than expected compared to other members of their families and are otherwise normal in appearance. Mental retardation is not associated with triple X syndrome; however, IQ scores tend to be 15-20 points lower than their siblings. The tendency for these girls to have speech, language, and motor delays may contribute to difficulty in psychosocial adjustments, such as shyness and immaturity, particularly during adolescence. There appears to be an increased risk for decreased self-esteem and self-confidence, but there is considerable variation within the group, and precise predictions are not possible. Sexual function, genitalia, and fertility are all normal, and studies show that their children are not at significantly increased risk for chromosome abnormalities.

Most affected women go through their entire lives without knowing they have an extra X chromosome. This syndrome is usually identified through prenatal diagnosis because girls with triple X syndrome are physically similar to girls with normal chromosomes.

Cause
Our genes are instructions or blueprints that make each human being unique. Our genes are packaged into chromosomes, and human beings usually have 46 chromosomes. Chromosomes come in pairs, and we inherit one of each pair from our mother and the other from our father. One of those pairs is the sex chromosomes, and they are called that because they determine the sex of the individual. Normally, females have two X chromosomes, and males have one X and one Y chromosome.

Sometimes, instead of having two sex chromosomes, babies are born with a different number or different combination of sex chromosomes. This happens completely by chance in pregnancies of women from all ages and ethnic backgrounds. Sex chromosome abnormalities are some of the most common chromosome abnormalities. Approximately 2 to 3 babies are born with a sex chromosome abnormality every day in California.

Diagnosis
Triple X syndrome can be detected through prenatal diagnostic tests, such as chorionic villus sampling (CVS) and amniocentesis. These diagnostic tests look directly at the fetal chromosomes, so they provide a definitive answer as to whether or not a fetus has triple X syndrome. Most of the recognized cases of XXX syndrome are due to prenatal testing. Since only a minority of women have prenatal diagnosis, most pregnancies affected with triple X syndrome are never recognized.

Treatment/Services
Your chromosomes are in almost every cell of your body and it is impossible to correct the number of sex chromosomes present. Treatment or management of possible learning disabilities would be similar to services provided to other children who need motor, reading, or language help. With early intervention (such as speech and/or physical therapy) and family support, most girls with XXX syndrome have performed just as well as their chromosomally normal peers.

RESOURCES

Genetic Home Reference: Triple X syndrome - General information about triple X syndrome provided by the National Library of Health. Also includes links to related sites.

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