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1616953 tn?1443835511

Speed of testing & treatment?

I think I already know the answer but I'm curious what others think.    My two uncles have (had) prostate cancer.   One had the type that spread quickly and he died rather young.   The younger uncle was a little more careful about (Fairly) regular physicals and having a PSA done.   He caught his prostate cancer in time that chemical castration and hormone therapy is keeping him around for a while.   He doesn't much care for the estrogen side effects.   I'm not sure how he deals with not having testosterone.  

Anyway my PSA went from 1.5s then suddenly it went to 4.5    I'm to have a biopsy done but I've talked to my doctor who says its quite possible the test won't find it.   *Some percentage of discovery.   If there is some way to take care of this soon enough for a real cure I would rather opt for a missing prostate then letting it get worse and put me into my Uncle's situations.    Doc said that doing a radical at this point would be malpractice.   I'm not keen on the prostate issues I already have (Inability to void at times, cathing etc)   We were talking about TURP.    Why not just remove the thing and be done with it?   How would it be medical malpractice?   I understand the side affect of surgery comes with a chance of urinary issues but....   I've already got those.  

Confused
4 Responses
Avatar universal
A little knowledge is a dangerous thing.   Right now you seem to have a little knowledge.

You don't give your age, or that of your uncles.
You don't mention your father, if alive, and his condition.
Either way,  you are not your uncles.
The fact that your psa jumps up to 4.5 quickly more likely means the increase is NOT due to prostate cancer.  Big jumps are more likely to be from inflammation.  Some form of prostatitis, even if   you don't have apparent systems.

Yes, you already have prostate issues, requiring cathing,  but that is quite different than leaking.  

Slow down, and get your biopsy.   Talk of surgical removal is very premature.

1616953 tn?1443835511
I'm afraid I'm letting this all disturb me quite a lot so this will probably sound random and blathering.

My father died at age 49 from heart disease.  

Uncle #1 died of the "quick" kind of prostate cancer.   He was still working (I don't know his age) but he was youngish.   I would really be guessing but in his early 60s?  *I'll have to check that out with one of my cousins.   The other uncle's prostate cancer was caught too late for a "cure" but he is holding out with hormone type therapy.  He is past retirement and I'm a little more clear on his age.   Around 70 years old + or -.  Me?  I'm 55.  

For what its worth my doctor agreed with you on being premature getting spun up about surgery etc before the results of my biopsy came back.  

Unfortunately I had my follow up today and was diagnosed with prostate cancer...  (sigh)  

So today he told me surgery, radiation (or observation) are all choices.  Anyone of them being a "good" choice.   My take on it is that its kind of a pick your poison type of thing.

On the good side he reports that I'm still on the detected early lower grade stage and have a good chance for a cure (Removal and or radiation)   The do nothing with close observation sounded (to me)like an option if I was older or had a shorter expected lifespan.   Radiation first sounds like it makes surgery (later) difficult to impossible.   Plus with my obstructive issues radiation (Seeds) make it more likely (he said) to make that worse where surgery would "solve" my obstruction problem.   He went on about his patients experiences in "leaking" and how this is rather hit or miss as far as getting to the dry stage (how long) and the potential for long term leakage problems and so forth.

I guess its only a side note but the biopsy was really un pleasent.  I've learned (again) that the stuff they use to numb you up has little to no effect on me.   Once the needles were inside the prostate whatever he used (An injection) worked but getting there was really gawd-awful.  

I'm told an MRI and another biopsy are next to see that the diagnosis was correct and not some failure in the lab.    MRI?  Fine...  Taking more cores is not at all what I'm looking forward to.   Actually none of this is...   But I'm grateful for the caught early part of this.
1616953 tn?1443835511
Just an update.  They removed my prostate and found that my cancer was the "bad" kind.  Which makes me want to say that sometimes its good to let yourself get spun up.  Its very important to advocate for yourself and not let the "remain calm - do nothing" attitude that we often hear is not (in my opinion) the best way to deal with things.  I'm not saying you need to light your hair on fire but you do have to advocate for yourself.  Learn about your issues, speak up.  Continue to speak up if the problem is not solved.   6 months post radical prostectomy and I'm cancer free.  

Hoo Hoo!  Life is GOOD!
Avatar universal
Just curious,  but what do you mean by the bad kind.

Was the post surgery pathology a high Gleason number?

Or was the cancer spread into some dangerous areas.
Since your 6 months follow up shows you to be cancer free,  I can  assume it wasn't outside the area removed by the surgery.
A good outcome.

Now, for a important note.  Your father died of heart disease at a very early age.   I'm thinking that danger should be your main area of concern going forward.    While I don't know about your mother,  you could inherit your father's genes which may have contributed to his early death.

How is your cholesterol and by chance do you know what your father's was prior to his death?
Unless you have very low cholesterol... total and LDL,  etc,  then I'd probably be making some fairly significant changes in my lifestyle... diet, etc.

Again,  nice to hear about your successful and "needed" surgery.
1 Comments
Thanks...  I'm glad to be around and at this point I'm not in a panic waiting for PSA tests to continue to show zero.  And while I know this is not popular I say get PSA tests regularly and don't ignore sudden changes.   Mine never got super high but the change was the think that led to the biopsy.  

BTW Sorry about the very long gap between question and my reply.  It was the spread of the cancer from detection to prostate removal.  It was about to escape from the capsule *I'm wording this wrong.   Anyway the doctor that removed the prostate told me that this was done just in time because any longer and it would have gotten loose and I would have been in my second uncles shoes having some form of castration (Chemical or surgical) and being on estrogen.  He was "ok" but obviously the estrogen created a lot of issues.  He died a while ago so I think the doctors would say that prostate cancer didn't kill him but it certainly wasn't the kind we keep hearing about that grows so slowly its not worth bothering about.  BTW I asked my Urologist about "watchful waiting" and my impression was that this was BS.  In general when I hear things like PSA tests are not "accurate" and Prostate Cancer can be ignored I call bull ****.  These people who come up with studies like this baffle me.  What motivates them and how do they seem to come up with totally different conclusions that seem to all agree on things that lower health care cost?   Maybe I'm paranoid but I smell a rat.

On your other question.   Sorry I have no data.  My Dad was a heavy smoker and drinker and I believe he avoided doctors so what killed him I think was lifestyle.   Stress and probably some anxiety and depression (2nd hand report from a cousin) might be part of the mix but I really don't know.  My cholesterol levels were really high but I have a GP that I see regularly and she caught that early and my labs look great for LDL and triglicirides (Spelzed?)
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