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Undefind cause for syncope vasovagal

After many tests and laboratories, my young doughther (19) is even worst. She has 6 weeks on bed, and can not stand up without fainting. She had been treated in many ways with no results.
What can be done in this case? Does exist a new diagnotic method not popular yet in Latin America?
thanks  
2 Responses
351246 tn?1379682132
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Hi
Thanks for writing to the forum!
Your daughter could be having vertigo that results in fainting.
“Vertigo can be caused by disorders of body parts that are involved in maintaining balance:
• Inner ear
• Brain stem and cerebellum
• Nerve tracts connecting the brain stem and cerebellum or within the brain stem
Inner Ear Disorders: Most commonly, vertigo results from motion sickness. Motion sickness may develop in people whose inner ear is sensitive to particular motions, such as swaying or sudden stopping and starting.
Another common cause of vertigo is an abnormal collection of calcium particles in one semicircular canal of the inner ear. The resulting disorder, called benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, or BPPV, is especially common among older people. It occurs when the head is moved in certain ways.
Meniere's disease produces attacks of vertigo. The cause of Meniere's disease is thought to involve excess fluid in the inner ear (hydrops). What triggers this is unknown, but it may result from an autoimmune reaction, an allergy, an imbalance in the autonomic nervous system, a blockage to certain structures in the ear, or a viral infection.
Disorders of the vestibulocochlear nerve can cause vertigo, a hearing disorder, or both.
Other disorders that may cause vertigo by affecting the inner ear or its nerve connections include the following:
• Bacterial or viral infections, such as vestibular neuritis, herpes zoster, and mastoiditis
• Paget's disease
• Tumors, such as an auditory nerve tumor
• Inflammation of nerves
The inner ear may also be damaged by drugs, such as aminoglycoside antibiotics, aspirin
, the chemotherapy drug cisplatin, the sedative Phenobarbital, the anticonvulsant phenytoin, the antipsychotic chlorpromazine and certain diuretics including furosemide Excessive use of alcohol can cause temporary vertigo.
Disorders That Affect the Brain: A decrease in the blood supply through arteries to the brain stem, cerebellum, and back of the brain can cause vertigo. This decrease is called vertebrobasilar insufficiency because the arteries affected include the vertebral and basilar arteries. If the decreased blood supply causes temporary symptoms, a transient ischemic attack (TIA) is diagnosed. If permanent damage results, a stroke is diagnosed.
Less common disorders that cause vertigo by affecting the brain stem or cerebellum include multiple sclerosis, fractures at the base of the skull, head injuries, seizures, infections, and tumors growing in or near the base of the brain. Vertigo can sometimes be part of a migraine attack and occasionally occur without the headache.
Occasionally, vertigo is caused by disorders that suddenly increase pressure within the skull, putting pressure on the brain. These disorders include benign intracranial hypertension, brain tumors, and bleeding (hemorrhage) within the skull.” Refer: http://www.merck.com/mmhe/sec06/ch080/ch080c.html
Dizziness could be also be due to postural hypotension (blood pressure falling with change of position), internal ear problems and cervical spondylitis. All these cause dizziness when you get up from lying down position. Cervical spondylitis and ear problems also cause dizziness on changing the position of the neck. Other causes are anemia, GERD, hypoglycemia or low sugar and some endocrine problems. Certain types of epilepsies and seizures too can cause similar symptoms.

Hope this helps. It is difficult to comment beyond this at this stage. Please let me know if there is any thing else and do keep me posted. Take care!

612876 tn?1355514495
There is an entire community here on MedHelp for "dysautonomia," which includes vasovagal syncope.  I think you may find additional help if you also post in our community.  You can find the dysautonomia community here:  

http://www.medhelp.org/forums/Dysautonomia-Autonomic-Dysfunction/show/266

(Vasovagal syncope is also known as neurocardiogenic syncope; you may want to do a search for posts using either of these terms in the search bar where it says "search this community" to learn more from past posts on the subject while you are waiting for a response to your question.)
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