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will i live with bells palsy forever?

Hi, i am a 20 year old female and i was diagnosed with bells palsy about 14 months ago, i took the presidone as directed and even though it had improved a little bit after taking them, there is still some paralaysis, after the first couple months it stopped improving, for instance i can't really smile, is is going to stay like this and is there anything i can do for it? i have heard that some people resort to reconstructive surgery but i dont see that as an option is there anything else i can do or am stuck with this for the rest of my life?
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620923 tn?1452915648

  Everyone is different in how long they may have this or if it's affects go away.....there is a woman that has visual lasting effects and has spoken publicly....here is a link to some of her info I am sure with more research u can find more info regarding her and the condition. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nancy_Zieman

I pray u find answers
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Avatar universal
See a sleep center. Recurrent "Bells Palsy" is actually very characteristic of narcolepsy with cataplexy. In fact, often times, it's not "Bells Palsy," but cataplexy. Viruses and some vaccines (namely the H1N1) can actually precipitate this, but it can happen seemingly in random fashion, too.

It doesn't look the way you think it looks. Common misdiagnoses are depression, epilepsy, and migraines. I struggled for years to find an answer, and was misdiagnosed several times. I had it with just sleepiness during the day and what looked like insomnia at night for probably about 15-20 years before I ended up with more serious symptoms of narcolepsy that actually included cataplexy (random muscle weakness that can either be isolated, or widespread).

The cataplexy manifested first in my face, as what looked like episodes of Bells Palsy that came and went when I was tired, stressed, or even when I was happy and smiling.  But when I paid closer attention I realized I got weakness and twitching (not uncommon) in my other muscles sometimes too, though I chalked it up to clumsiness until I paid attention. I also had issues with my vision randomly and sleepiness.

I went undiagnosed for about 15-20 years, until I finally saw a sleep specialist and she nailed the diagnosis right away. The vast majority of doctors have absolutely no idea what it is or what it looks like, and no routine lab tests, MRI, CT scan, x-ray or anything of that nature will detect it. 75% of people with narcolepsy never get diagnosed in their lifetime.

I was tested for epilepsy, migraines, MS, all kinds of things. But nope, it turned out to be narcolepsy!!

Get seen by a sleep center!
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