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Avatar universal

low saturations while sleeping?

I have a long history of shortness of breath with exercise. I am a 49 year old female and have been investigated for everything. I have elevated pulmonary pressures on echoes but a right heart catheterization done 5 years ago was normal. Last year I had a TIA and the MRI showed 3 previous strokes. They ruled out the cause being my heart but when I had a stress echo done, my pulmonary pressures went really high so they are looking at my lungs again. The last little while, I have been quite short of breath when I get up at night so I checked my saturations this morning before getting out of bed. They were 91%. They went to 96 when I got up. It makes me wonder how low they go during the night. Is this normal? What do I do if it is not?
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Avatar universal
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Hello and hope you are doing well.

Normal oxygen saturation values are 97% to 99% in a healthy individual. It is not normal to have low O2 sats at night. Low O2 sats while sleeping could sometimes be due to obstructive sleep apnea. When a person sleeps the airways are usually patent allowing normal passage for air entry. The upper airway that is at the region of the tongue and the soft palate is the most compliant (soft) part. So, this is liable to collapse and cause airway obstruction. I would advise you to consult a sleep specialist who would assess with first a sleep questionnaire, and then he may ask for a polysomnogram, which is an overnight sleep study as this helps to detect the apneas.

Hope this helped and do keep us posted.
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