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pelvic inflammatory disease

i was diagnosed with pelvic inflammatory disease twice in two months.how do i prevent a repeat?
4 Responses
1415174 tn?1453243103
You need to find out which organisms are actually causing the problem. Have you had cultures and/or PCR done to check for bacterial vaginosis? The bacteria that can cause BV can also cause PID and have a high recurrance rate. If you can get the doctor to culture for these organisms associated with BV and  PID it may help::
BV: Gardnerlla vaginalis
       Mobiluncus species
       Atopobium vaginae
       Trichomonas vaginalis
       Mycoplasma hominis
       Ureaplasma urealyticum
       E. coli and other gut bacteria.

PID is an infection of the upper Urogenital tract (fallopian tubes, ovaries, edometrium. Other things that cause these organisms to take over or cause infection are change in Ph due to douching,or other changes that cause Ph changes,  having Gonorrhoeae can cause this as well. Usually, an infection with GC can go unnoticed and then you are not treated with the proper antibiotics and then get PID. Also, GC is becoming very resistant and it could be that you were not diagnosed properly and then given the wrong antibiotic.
They need to do an endocervial culture to check for GC and Chlamydia trachomatis as well.

They can treat with broadly acting antibiotics to get rid of all of these organisms. But you need to have the cultures done and /or PCR to find out the root cause.

The problem is the doctors will treat you with the broadly acting antibiotic but if they don't check you for GC and CT and the other organisms I mentioned above then they may not be giving you the right antibiotic.
hope this helps.
mkh9




Avatar universal
There is one ominous bacteria that mkh9 did not list. I have been doing a lot of  research regarding PID as I was finally diagnosed last night after 3 months of doctors ignoring my concern about this illness due to negative STD results for Chlamydia and Gonorrhea. I combed every scientific article I could find on the subject, particularly those cited by the CDC.

It's called Mycoplasma genitalium, and unlike GC, CT, and the others listed, it's VERY difficult to culture. Therefore, it is hard to test for. It has officially been deemed an STI, and is more prevalent in the US population than Gonorhea, particularly among men. Like many other STIs, many infected people are symptomless or have mild symptoms, so they never get treated. There is research being done to linked this tiny bacteria, which presents symptoms similar to Chlamydia, to PID and the high number of unexplained infertility case. It has also been associated with BV. Azithromycin is the drug of choice to treat it, but there have been some cases of spontaneous resistance, in which case, moxifloxacin is used. So far, it hasn't gained resistance to the latter.

I hope you have been successfully treated by now, but if not, I  hope this info may offer another possible explanation and avenue to explore. Beyond that, I hope anyone reading this who has classic symptoms of PID or Urinary issues, but no positive tests or successfull treatment, to seek out a doctor who will try looking into this horrible little bacteria...  
1415174 tn?1453243103
Yes you are entirely correct. I forgot to mention M. genitalium and I don't know why I did that as I worked with it at a biotech and they have a PCR test for it. I don't know if the test is FDA approved or not but they do test for it. Yes, It is very hard to culture. Thanks for reminding me.
mkh9
1415174 tn?1453243103
Yes the last post is entirely correct. I forgot to mention M. genitalium and I don't know why I did that as I worked with it at a biotech and I worked on a PCR test for it. I don't know if the test is FDA approved or not but they do test for it. Yes, It is very hard to culture. Sorry I left that bacteria out of the equation.
regards,
mkh9
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