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Avatar universal

Need Piece of Mind

Had a similar incident as many other folks, but wanted to get your opinion on my experience.  I was at a strip club with a buddy, and we got some private dances.  Girl unexpectedly pull out my penis and started oral.  I was shocked as this was not discussed, and after I got over my shock had her stop (about 30 seconds), but she finshed dancing. I left 10 minutes later went to the bathroom and urinated (thinking that would flush out anything she gave me)

I am almost OCD about germs, it sounds crazy but got in my car and put some hand sanitizer on my penis thinking it would kill anything that I had on it.  Got home and washed with soap and water and again scared that I had something and needed to flush out, masturbated.

I know you have stated repeatedly this is a low risk situation but still somewhat nervous.  I have a little bump (very small) towards the base of the shaft, but I know for a fact this has been here for a couple of weeks and I think it is an ingrown hair or something.

So a couple of questions:

1) I know the bump is not from this encounter as it was there before, but does that make it easier to get something?  I put alcohol on it to see if it burned and it didn't so I figured it was not an open bump.

2) Worst case, what are the chances of getting herpes from this.  She did not have any noticeable lesions on her mouth, but it was kind of dark (other than the blacklight), so I am wondering if she did have something I didn't notice how likey is it to get herpes.  This may mean nothing, but she was drinking alcohol and doing shots with limes, I assume that would burn like heck if she had an open sore in her mouth.

3) When could I get tested if I wanted to and know if I got anything.

Thanks, just very nervous and looking for some piece of mind.
10 Responses
239123 tn?1267651214
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Welcome to the forum.  But you and other potential questioners should realize we really don't evaluate individual situations unless they are unique.  You can expect the same answers you found for "many folks with similar incidents".

Hand-genital contact doesn't transmit STDs.

1) I really cannot judge the cause of the penile bump.  Genital warts often are a consideration for such things, but not seeing it I can say no more.  In any case, it doesn't increase the disease transmission risk; still zero chance.

2) Can I absolutely guarantee herpes isn't possible?  No.  But in the entire history of all STD clinics, I'll be not one such case has ever been seen.  I also can't guarantee you won't be hit by a meteorite.

3) I recommend against testing for any STD.  If postive for anything, it would have to come from some other event.

Regards--  HHH, MD
Avatar universal
Thank Dr. Very helpful.

But just to be clear there was oral-genital contact not just hand-genital contact, but I assume your answer is still the same, very small chance even given a bump on the penis?

Also, I know you don't recomend it without symptoms, but when can you get tested and something might show up, I assume ghon and NGU would show up faster than say herpes.
239123 tn?1267651214
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
I missed the oral part, but still no risk to speak of.  It is rare to catch any STD from oral sex.  You wouldn't know that by reading the forum, since there are lots of questions from people who believe they caught something that way.  But most of them had symptoms only, mostly psychologica, with no actual infection; and even those with infection are the small minority.  The thousands of others who get no symptoms of course don't come to the forum to complain about it.

There are no tests for asymptomatic NGU; if no symptoms, there is no way to reliably diagnose it.  Chlamydia rarely occurs from oral sex.  Gonorrhea almost always causes obvious symptoms.  So there are no urethral infections for which you need testing if you don't get symptoms.  But if you insist on spending some dollars you don't really need, a urine gonorrhea test would be accurate any time 2 or more days after exposure.  And if you have still more money to spend more or less uselessly, you could have syphilis and HIV blood tests at 6 weeks and HSV testing at 12 weeks.

I suggest you just go on with your life and stop obesesing about such a low risk event.  That's all for this thread; I won't have any further comments or advice.  
Avatar universal
Thanks so much for the response and advice.  I know you must get sick of answering the same questions over and over.
239123 tn?1267651214
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
The frustrating part is on behalf of people who seem to think their entirely typical situations are somehow different from all the others.  Undoubtedly there will be lots of future users who will see this and still believe that THEIR oral sex exposure or THEIR hand-job somehow carries real risk even though none of them ever do.  Because it is so rare that the circumstances really are special, we just automatically give the same answers every time, so people aren't really getting anything in personal replies that they can't get from looking at others.  I'll bet tthousands of dollars are spent each year on this and the HIV prevention forum for questions whose answers are very clear by scanning previous discussions.

Anyway, take care and don't woryy about this event.
Avatar universal
Well hopefully the thousands of dollars is good for you and your colleague because you are doing good work.

I guess my main concern is that I just didn't see a lesion or sore on (in?) her mouth.  Is it safe to assume that if she had an outbreak that I would have noticed (and she probably wouldn't work at this time for that reason)?  And even if she did have a sore I couldn't see I assume the risk of transmission is still low based on the other threads correct (albeit higher risk than if no sores are present)?

Hopefully this is my last post as I know you wanted to end this thread.

Thanks.
239123 tn?1267651214
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
If you didn't see an obvious sore on her lips or face, it is unlikely she was having an oral herpes outbreak.  Common sense says that most sex workers would know to not perform oral sex on clients when they have active oral herpes.

That's indeed all for this thread.  
Avatar universal
Thanks Doc - I actually went back to the club and talked with her for about 30 minutes to see if she had any sores, everything looked normal, and I was really focused on her mouth, so that is good.  Although she was quite offended when I told her I was nervous about catching something.
239123 tn?1267651214
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
If that's reassuring to you, fine -- but this is quite an overreaction to a virtually zero risk event.  I'm not surprised she was offended; I suspect most people would be as well (depending in part on style, tone, body language etc).

That's all for this thread.  Move on.
Avatar universal
Thanks again, done asking questions.

One suggestion though would be to leave a post similar to one recent post where you broke down the likely percentage chance of contracting HSV from a singular ORAL sexual encounter (I assume less than the 1% with regular sex) with a known HSV positive person. There seems to be a lot of "single brief encounters in strip clubs" (and everyone automatically assumes a stripper has something) so it may reduce the amount of simliar questions you get.

Just a thought, thanks again.
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