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Oral Sex and HPV

I have a question about oral sex And HPV. I have been with the same women for seven years and both of us have been faithful. A couple years after us being together she had a leep procedure for HPV. She has never had any visible signs of warts that I know of. Me on the other hand I have had a couple of small spots That went away on their own. Neither one of us have been formally diagnosed with genital warts. But my question is this, since we have been sexually active for so long with out protection and both have performed oral sex Several times on another but not recently, do you think that it is safe To have oral sex And if so does it matter if WARTS ARE PRESENT? Or is this something that I need to even worry about since we have already had sex and oral sex and been together so long even though it’s been a while for oral. So would it be safe for us to do this or should we stay away from it? Is it even likely that either one of us can develop oral warts? Or again is it even problem since we have been together so long and we both have been exposed and maybe our bodies have fought it off. As a side note, I also have read that oral warts are rare and mainly occur in people with compromised immune systems. Any good insight into this would be greatly appreciated.

4 Responses
239123 tn?1267647614
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Welcome to the forum.  Thanks for your question.

First, entirely different types of HPV cause warts versus most cervical infections requiring LEEP.  So warts may not be a risk at all.  Second, any HPV strains either of you has been infected with has long been shared by both of you; you can safely assume you have been infected with the same one that caused your partner's abnormal pap.  However, it is very likely your immune system has cleared it, and which also prevents new infection with the same HPV type.  So at this point you're probably home free with regard to either genital or oral infection.

In general, oral infection with genital HPV types is about one tenth as common as genital, even in people who regularly have oral sex.  These strains apparently doesn't take hold in the mouth as well as the genital area.  Oral warts are especially rare and, as you suggest, are seen primarily in people with serious immune deficiencies.

Considering all these issues, you really have nothing to worry about.  If you remain interested in these topics, take a look at the threads whose links I have provided below:

http://www.medhelp.org/posts/STDs/HPV-and-oral-sex/show/1515473
http://www.medhelp.org/posts/STDs/Oral-HPV-Cancer-Risk/show/1512873

Best regards--  HHH, MD
Avatar universal
So I guess since we have already had oral sex thenn the so called damage is done. You said that it may not be GW at all. In your opinon what do you this the spots were that I had that wen away on theri own? Also, If it was warts and it came backk is the infection roate of the mouth higher when giving oral sex with warts being present?
239123 tn?1267647614
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
I can't speculate on the cause of the "spots" you had on your penis.  I suppose they could have been related to HPV, but there are numerous potential possibilities other than warts or other STDs.

There is no known relationship between oral infection and exposure to known warts.

I don't think any "damage" has been done at all.  Even if you have had a genital or oral HPV infection, it's probably long gone and will never cause any health probleml.  You should view HPV, whether oral or genital, as a normal, expected, and unavoidable consequence of being a sexual human.  This whole business really should not be on your mind at all.

That will end this thread.  Take care.
Avatar universal
Thanks for all of your help!
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