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Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

Dear Doctor,
I am a 22-year old female who had protected sex with a gay male a week ago. This was my first time having sex. He used his saliva as lubricant on his penis beforehand. Since then, I've had light sensitivity/ soreness/ tingling in my uterus area, as well as some itchiness around the outside of my vagina and a bit heavier vaginal discharge than normal.
I am worried about the possibility that I could have PID from bacteria in his saliva or from the Chlamydia or Gonorrhea bacterias. I have a scheduled appointment with a doctor in five days, but I'm wondering if I should try to see a doctor sooner or go to an emergency room to make sure things are OK. I am very concerned. Please help!
3 Responses
300980 tn?1194929400
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
I presume that you mean that your partner used his saliva to lubricate the condom.  If this is the case, the chance that you have PID or, for that matter, any other STD is very low.  Protected sex is a very effective way to prevent getting STDs.  

It is not unusual for there to be a certain amount of day-to-day variation in the amount of vaginal discharge present and it would not be surprising to find that your discharge had changed somewhat after your first episode of intercourse.

As far as getting evaluated by your doctor.  I would suggest you call your doctor back tomorrow and ask if you can come in a bit earlier, explaining that you are a bit concerned about new genital symptoms including about a recent change in the nature of your discharge.  

Hope this helps.  EWH
Avatar universal
Thank you for your quick response, doctor.

Yes, he used his saliva on the outside of the condom.

Should I be concerned about the discomfort I am feeling in my uterus? It began a couple days after intercourse. I read that PID symptoms can appear up to a few days after exposure. Although my partner was wearing a condom, I am worried that bacteria in his saliva could be causing PID. Do you think this is possible? How likely is it that symptoms would appear so quickly? Thank you.
300980 tn?1194929400
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
You are correct that PID can have its onset shortly after intercourse  but it would be most ususual for PID to occur due to bacteria found in his saliva or after condom-protected intercourse.  I treuly doubt that you have PID.  On the other hand, it is better to be safe than sorry and that is the reason I have suggested gtrying to get in to see your doctor sooner than five days from now.  EWH

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