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Avatar universal

Wake up seeing things???

I have, on SEVERAL occasions, woke up about an hour or so after I dose off (at night) to sleep and I think I see things.  Example:  I woke up one time swearing that there was a spider on the wall.  I woke up my husband and he said there was nothing there.  I feel like I'm totally awake, eyes open, speaking clearly, everything.  I just don't understand why this happens.  Sometimes when it begins, I tell him that it's not like before and I tell him that this time I really do see something.  So...I do realize what I'm doing at the time.  Then I go right back to sleep with no problems.  It's funny when it occurs because it's become a regular thing but I know this can't be normal.  Can someone please explain why this occurs?
587 Responses
Avatar universal
I used to experience similar situations and some others and was diagnosed with narcolepsy 10 months ago - do you also suffer from daytime tiredness? or wake up unable to move? or fall asleep at inappropriate times?
Avatar universal
No, no, and no.  I work all day and feel fine.  I do drink alot of caffeine (Mt. Dew) during working hours.  I come home, take a bath, eat, spend time with kids, lay down around 9 and fall asleep around 10:30-11:00.  Up again at 6:15.  I did get into a habit of taking sleeping pills.  At first I thought this occured because of the pills but the "hallucinations" happened way before that.  It's weird because I always "see" some kind of bugs.  I'm not scared of them.  It's just crazy that this happens.  I don't drink alcohol or take drugs so that's not it either.
Avatar universal
Hi,
I have not heard of anything like this. I would suggest you to undergo a sleep study after consulting with a sleep specialist.
Avatar universal
Hi, i just stumbled across this post on google. I also experience situations quite similar to yours! It has been happening on and off since i was a child. I would always see insects, bees, or rats and i'd usually just jump in fright. but the past two time that it's happened, i jumped out of bed and hurt myself, and also hit my partner because i saw insects on her face.. i know i sound crazy, but i would really like to know what causes this...
Avatar universal
Hi, do you have any other associated symptoms at same time, anything that triggers off. Do you feel any severe stress at work place. Sooner it is better you consult a neurophysician for advise. Bye.
Avatar universal
I'm currently having the same thing happen to me.  It doesn't seem to be like its stemming from a dream or a nightmare, i just open my eyes at night and see these, things in the room with me.  People in the corner, maggots, snakes, spiders, mice in the bed, even the ceiling caving in.  It's really getting old.  When I was single, it was just kind of funny.  But now that I'm married, its awful.  I try to pull my wife out of the bed to save her or cover her face with the pillow so the animals don't get her.  But the strangest thing, is that once i realize i'm just being stupid, my head hits the pillow and I'm asleep in no time, while she'd lying there with her heart pounding scared half to death.  In looking for whats the cause, I've seen a lot of things, but I don't think I have a sleep disorder, because I sleep great.  I've never taken drugs, prescription or non.  One message board mentioned that its merely a nutritional deficiency thing, so I'm going to try some multi vitamins.  That doesn't seem like it could be it, but i'll try about anything.  And if that doesn't work, I'm going to have my head examined. haha
Avatar universal
I can't believe others have had this same experience.  I wake up to these things and am absolutely terrified- but it is often hard to go back to bed because I really doubt whether what I saw was just my imagination.  I would LOVE to know why I have this- it is really exhausting some nights- other nights I sleep just fine.  Insects are the most common thing I see- usually falling from the ceiling or coming towards me and I frantically jump out of bed, heart pounding.  I used to see bats flying around my room, sometimes people or very bizarre things.  It never fails to terrify me.
Avatar universal
I know someone who would wake up and see things like huge spiders on the wall, etc. Her doctor said her oxygen would go real low during times she stopped breathing with sleep apnea. She now uses a cpap machine and no longer wakes up seeing scary things.
Avatar universal
Hi, how are you doing. You are probably suffering from narcolepsy which affects the control of sleep and wakefulness with experience of excessive daytime sleepiness and intermittent, uncontrollable episodes of falling asleep during the daytime. It can interfere with normal activities on a daily basis, there can be mental cloudiness, a lack of energy and concentration, memory lapses, a depressed mood,  run down feeling, feelings of weakness and a loss of voluntary muscle control. Hallucinations - delusional experiences are vivid and might be frightening, basically visual and other senses can be involved either at onset of sleep or while coming out of sleep. You need to change lifestyle adjustments like as avoiding caffeine, alcohol, smoking and heavy meals. A healthy sleeping habit, scheduling daytime naps (30-60 minutes in length), and normal regular exercise and meal schedule may also be os some help. It is better to get a sleep study done and advice from your physician. Take care.
Avatar universal
Im no expert, but i know that when we sleep, a chemical called DMT (Dimethyltryptamine) is produced in our brains.  This chemical is a halucinogenic, this is why we dream.  So im thinking you may be producing too much of this chemical and it gives you vivid images of things that are not really there.

You should go to the doctors, im sure there is a treatment, but obviously it isnt serious at all.

*source* http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/bb/neuro/neuro03/web1/npatel.html
Avatar universal
Oh my gosh, I did not think that I would really find anything on the subject.  This also happens to me. At first I was a little bit worried.  After a while, I realized that nothing would harm me, and that they would go away.  Usually I wake to see spiders crawlig on the wall.  The first time it happened, I got scarred and closed my eyes.  After I opened them again, it was gone. After a couple more times I decided to keep looking (instead of hiding under my covers), I realized thatI can actually watch the spiders crawl (but only until I close my eyes), once I close my eyes, the spiders are always gone upon re-opening them. It is very strange.  I started to think that it was kind of interesting until last night.  Last night, I awoke to see the shadow of a man standing next to my bed, he had his arm up like he was going to do something to me.  It seemed so real, I started swinging my arms and kicking while trying to keep my head out of harms way.  After a second, I looked and realized that no one was there.  It seemed so real.  The spiders were tollerable, the man... not so much.  
Avatar universal
Hi SAK521, hope you are feeling better now? Is there any improvement in your sleep now? It is better to seek medical advice from a neurophysician and a sleep specialist to get investigated for better treatment. It also seems that you are being under stress due to a sleep deprivation or very hard day at your work or in coping up with daily routines. These hallucinations are temporary but really scaring and no physical harm is caused and seen with narcolepsies. Have you taken any medications so far and is it progressing? Do follow the above sleep tips and share your thoughts. Take care.
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