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Waking up 3am

Hello Everyone ,  

I have this weird case  i normally  when  not workign or having days off such as vacations  i sleep alot  for soem reason  since november im waking up around 3am  for no reason  and  also im not able to sleep after 8am  on the past i was able to sleepup to  10 or 11 a on weekends , im sbeen  through to  some stress which i guess my be the problem but do you have any  other input ?

Thanks a lot every one :)
Best Answer
4548110 tn?1362307394
Is it a sleep disorder?
Do you . . .
*feel irritable or sleepy during the day?
*have difficulty staying awake when sitting still, watching television or reading?
*fall asleep or feel very tired while driving?
*have difficulty concentrating?
*often get told by others that you look tired?
*react slowly?
*have trouble controlling your emotions?
*feel like you have to take a nap almost every day?
*require caffeinated beverages to keep yourself going?

If you answered “yes” to any of the previous questions, you may have a sleep disorder.


Sleep disorder 1: Sleep apnea
Sleep apnea is a common sleep disorder in which your breathing temporarily stops during sleep due to blockage of the upper airways. These pauses in breathing interrupt your sleep, leading to many awakenings each hour. While most people with sleep apnea don’t remember these awakenings, they feel the effects in other ways, such as exhaustion during the day, irritability and depression, and decreased productivity.

Sleep apnea is a serious, and potentially life-threatening, sleep disorder. If you suspect that you or a loved one may have sleep apnea, see a doctor right away. Sleep apnea can be successfully treated with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP), a mask-like device that delivers a stream of air while you sleep. Losing weight, elevating the head of the bed, and sleeping on your side can also help in cases of mild to moderate sleep apnea.

Symptoms of sleep apnea include:

*Loud, chronic snoring
*Frequent pauses in breathing during sleep
*Gasping, snorting, or choking during sleep
*Feeling unrefreshed after waking and sleepy during the day, no matter how much time you spent in bed
*Waking up with shortness of breath, chest pains, headaches, nasal congestion, or a dry throat.



Sleep disorder 2: Restless legs syndrome (RLS)
Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a sleep disorder that causes an almost irresistible urge to move your legs (or arms). The urge to move occurs when you’re resting or lying down and is usually due to uncomfortable, tingly, aching, or creeping sensations.

Common signs and symptoms of restless legs syndrome include:

*Uncomfortable sensations deep within the legs, accompanied by a strong urge to move them.
*The leg sensations are triggered by rest and get worse at night.
*The uncomfortable sensations temporarily get better when you move, stretch, or massage your legs.
*Repetitive cramping or jerking of the legs during sleep.



Sleep disorder 3: Narcolepsy
Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder that involves excessive, uncontrollable daytime sleepiness. It is caused by a dysfunction of the brain mechanism that controls sleeping and waking. If you have narcolepsy, you may have “sleep attacks” while in the middle of talking, working, or even driving.

Common signs and symptoms of narcolepsy include:

*Seeing or hearing things when you’re drowsy or starting to dream before you’re fully asleep.
*Suddenly feeling weak or losing control of your muscles when you’re laughing, angry, or experiencing other strong emotions.
*Dreaming right away after going to sleep or having intense dreams
*Feeling paralyzed and unable to move when you’re waking up or dozing off.

If this continues, contact a doctor.







4 Responses
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Avatar universal
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Hello and hope you are doing well.

There is a circadian rhythm for all living organisms. It is a 24 hour cycle rhythm and the biological clock within that individual adapts to this rhythm. You have set your rhythm in a particular way which suits your modes of work. To change this it will have to be a gradual process. You will have to reset the rhythm. For e.g. if you want to start getting up earlier, you will have to sleep earlier by say one hour and set an alarm for the time you want to get up. Continue this for some time. Then reset by another hour and repeat the process. This way you can reset your biological clock.

Hope this helped and do keep us posted.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
You know  now that you mentioned it Dr  i have change my  lfe rhythm drastically  that seesm to be the cause i thank you for your  support as well :)
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
that same hour....
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