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Avatar universal

tremors during sleep

I'm a 60 year old men, in excellent health, except for experiencing tremors during sleep that wake me up and have difficulty going  back to sleep.  As I start to fall sleep again, I feel these "rumbleling" (tremors) around my upper body.  I immediately wake up again.  These tremors last for about 10-15 seconds after I wake up.  The first time I experienced this condition was exactly two years ago.  It lasted for about four days and it simply went away.  Except for minor incidents (by "minor" I mean I experience the tremors for about two nights and go away) with no major disruptions in my sleep patters.  Last week, however, I experienced another episode which does not seem to be going away.  The first two nights I simply could not go back to sleep at all.  My body wanted to go back to sleep, but, as I mentioned above, everytime I fell sleep the tremors woke me up.  I'm on my  9th day and there seems to be no sign of letting up. I went to see my doctor on the fourth day--He prescribed Zolpidem, which I have been taken since.  Interestingly enough, even under the influence of the sleeping pill, the tremor wake me up, but they are short-lived since I go back to sleep almost immediately.  My doctor said to take the medicine for about two weeks and essencially placed me on a "wait-and-see" mode.  My concern at this point is "how long can I possobly survived on this medicine.  Does any body "out there" know anything about this condition?  As you can immagine, it is extremely debilitating.  I'm, for my age, a very atheletic man who is the right things, no vices and bikes to work every day--About
twenty miles a day.  Married with two grown children.  My job is very stress-free and very enjoyable.  Any ideas?  Thank you very much.
561 Responses
Avatar universal
Hi, how are you? Can you give some more details as to which part or whole of upper body does involve in the tremors you suffer from? Do you correlate with the initiation of these episodes with any particular event? You might be having a rhythmic movement disorder, which more or less resembles the symptoms or even age related. Has your doctor done a sleep study? You need to continue the medication for couple of weeks as advised by your doctor and try to avoid trigger factors like alcohol, smoking and stress. It is better to consult a neurologist and get evaluated. Take care and updated on your thoughts and progress.
Avatar universal
Thank you for your timely response.  My tremors are pretty much localized in my upper body; say, between my waist and my neck.  By the way, something I did not mention on my original description is that these tremors are not external.  As I pointed out, after they wake me up they last for about an extra 10-15 seconds and they disappeared completely.  During these 10-15 second period, I have asked my wife to place her hand on my stomach/chest so she can feel what I am experiencing.  She has never felt anything--This leads me to believe that they are totally interior in nature.  I Do not correlate the initiation of these tremors with any particular event/diet/state of mind?  I have not been able to determine what precipitates them.  I have changed my diet, my exercise routine to no avail.  I do have a bit of anxiety, but I truly believe it is as a result of the lack of sleep.  My wife thinks that I'm making things worse by turning all the clocks in the house (the ones that chime) off in order to avoid knowing the time so I don't panic by learning that I have ONLY a few hours left before I have to get up and get ready for work.  Again, she thinks I am creating a great deal of anxiety for myself.  Yes, I have a sleep study two years ago.  I did not experience the tremor that night.  The sleep specialist sent me to the cardiologist and they order a halter (24-hour monitoring of my heart functions) as well as a cardiogram--Everything turned out to be fine with my heart.  After all this, I went back to the sleep specialist and he simply stated that in further review of my sleep study, they determined that when I sleep I do not go into deeper stages of sleep, and he prescribed "Clonazepam."  By that time, my symptoms have gone away and I never took that medicine.  As I mentioned on my original symptom description, my symptoms disappeared after a few days (6-9 days), except for minor tremors once every three months or so, which do wake me up, but I seem to go back to sleep with no problem whatsoever.  I figured I can live with this "minor" inconvenience and not have to take any medicine.  But as I mentioned, this time is different.  The tremors don't let me go back to sleep, at all.  And that's when I "panic" and decided to see my doctor about about the problem.  He ordered some blood work to test the functions of some of my key glads.  I guess glands that in his opinion could be causing my problem if they are "malfunctioning."  He said my lab work came back perfect--No irregularities, whatsoever.  I mentioned to him about my sleep study and the medicine they had prescribed (Clonazepam)--He simply said:  "I hate to see you taking this type of medicine without knowing exactly what is going on with you--The side affects of this medicine could be more potentially harmful the problem you are experiencing."  I cannot think of what can be more problematic than not being able to sleep--But this is besides the point.  He also mentioned that he hated to order another sleep study based on the fact that I physically don't meet any of the criteria that will lead him to believe that I need one, i.e., obesity, smoking, heavy coffee drinker, heavy alcohol drinker--I'm 5' 9" and my weight is 150 lbs; I do not smoke or drink.  I pedal my bicycle to work every day.  Approximately a 20-mile round trip.  Stress, however, seem to be creeping up due to the fact that I am getting concern about my health due to lack of sleep.  My doctor did mentioned, as you did, that a neurological study might be appropriate, but he wants me to be on the sleeping pills for two weeks before we start talking about those options.  At any rate, I know you asked me a few questions/clarifications and I pretty much wrote a book for you.  I'm sorry about that.  I am simply excited about the fact that someone "out there"  has manifested some type of concern about my plight.  One more question, please.  You mentioned that I could have a "rhythmic disorder."  What is that?  Thank you again, whoever you are--You are a good person.
Avatar universal
Hi bobito, how are you? Thanks for your reply and time you spent in writing a lengthy details. Well, you can be patient for few more days and keep observing the progress of the jerks to see the effect of the drug you are presently taking. Stress is a major factor in triggering the symptoms and worsening the daily activities to sometimes even impossible. You can get a sleep study test done to know your present sleep pattern, which can also be discussed with your attending physician. Rhythmic movements occur during the stage just prior to falling asleep and typically increase along with stress levels. These are most common among very young children. Commonly seen in children but can affect any one, and usually slowly disappears but if presents a danger or the activity persists for long time, it is better to consult an Neurophysician soon to get an evaluation and also to rule out any other possibilities. Take care and keep updating us of your doctor advise.
Avatar universal
Your post is interesting as my son-in-law recently described almost identical symptoms that left him afraid to go to sleep for a while. He's only had a couple more mild episodes. My daughter said his tremblings/vibrations are not visible by observation - they are internal.

I've had similar sensations but not while asleep. I blamed them on low blood sugar but never really knew for sure. I have rythmic movements in my legs while asleep, but they feel like contractions or jerks when they wake me up.

Sorry, no answers. But I'll be watching to see if someone else comes up with something.

Avatar universal
I have the same thing happen to me sporadically, probably a few times a  week. As I'm drifting off to sleep I suddenly get "tremors" in my upper body that wake me up. If I try to go back to sleep there's a good chance it'll happen again. But if I put my hand on my chest I find that my heart's not beating all that fast, which makes me think it might be muscle twitches, possibly in my neck or chest. In any case I"m still trying to figure it out.

I've found that it's more likely to happen if I go to bed unusually early or late (or if I nap), and that a few glasses of wine seem to make it less likely to happen.

BTW I'm a 22-year old male of average height and weight with no real medical history.
Avatar universal
Hi bobito, how are you? Hope you are feeling better now? Are your tremors under control now and letting you to have a normal sleep? At your age, as discussed early also stress seems to be a trigger factor due to less activity and sleep deprivation. You need to get evaluated by a neurologist and get investigated. Have you checked your blood sugar and blood pressure? Even an EMG study would be helpful. Taking too many medicines also is not advisable so seek medical advise by a neurologist. Try to go for a morning-evening walk or regular stretches and body massages occasionally. Take warm shower and sleep early. Listening to your favorite music or reading book in a comforting room can put you to sleep. Do update on your progress and any visit to doctor. Take care.
Avatar universal
Hi, Suri--Thank you for asking--Actually I'm doing a little better--Allow me to explain why.  First of all, I would like to tell you that I took your advise--I talked to my doctor last week and asked (again) about a sleep study.  She agreed to it--I'm now in the process of scheduling a sleep study.  Most probably I will have one within the next three weeks--Secondly, I raised the issue of a consultation with a neurologist--She agreed to this, as well.  She said, however, to wait and see what the sleep study reveals, and then she will referred me to a neurologist--Again, this neurological study will depend on the sleep study results.  At that time, I also shared with her the fact that Ambien was not keeping me sleep.  The tremors will wake me up about three hours after taking the medicine and I could not go back to sleep.  She decided to change my prescription to Restoril.  She said to take it as needed.  Well, this medicine most definitely worked, but the side affects were simply horrible.  I took it for two days and the day after I felt as if I had been on a 5-day drinking binge.  In other words, a very nasty hangover.  I told my wife that I was simply stoping the medicine and "John Wayne" my situation--For the last two days I have not taking any medicine at all.  The first night, without medicine, I managed to sleep for a total of five hours.  The tremor were there, all right, but I guess I did not allow them to intimidate me as much as they had in the past.  Therefore, I did not stayed awake worrying about them.  Last night I slept about seven hours.  The tremors woke me up a couple of times, but I simply "ignored" them and I manged to go back to sleep.  As you can imagine, I'm very happy to know that I can sleep without the aid of the medicine--I'm looking forward to tonight to see how well I am going to sleep.  About my blood pressure, it is fine--On the average 114/70.  My resting pulse on the average is 52 Bpm.   I think this is due to the fact that I bike to work every day.  At any rate, thank you very much for your advise--Your advise is what armed me with enough gumption to go back to the doctor and asked for the sleep study and the neurological evaluation.  At any rate, my anxiety has decreased considerably due to the fact that I have actually slept without any aid from medication.  I'm somewhat proud of this, which in turn makes me happy.  I will love to share with you the results of my upcoming test.  Please, enjoy your weekend.
Avatar universal
Hi bobito, Thanks again for your reply. It is indeed your determination to do without medication what has proved fruitful. Good that you are able to get some sleep without need to medicine and also satisfactory sleep. You need to continue the same for some more days and if sleeping comfortably without pills, give it up as body has tremendous capacity to revert to normalcy. Do keep yourself bit physically active and get the sleep study test and discuss with your doctor. Now that you are doing better, do follow the healthy sleep tips as discussed above and update on your progress. Take care.
478095 tn?1210650359
I also have been having tremers right when im about to fall asleep.I'll wake up and my WHOLE body will be shaking for about 10 sec. but it doesnt hurt......Its kind of freaking me out!! also this does not relate to tremers....Sometimes I wake up screaming when I dont even dream.I was wondering if there might be a connection.I do have depression and im bi polar and I have severe ocd and anxiety and im on alot of med.But i've been on all these meds for about 9 mounths and these tremers just started 2 mounths ago.So I dont know if the meds might be to blame.Any info would be helpful thanks
Avatar universal
Hi Bobito,
I was so glad to read your detailed description of the night tremors because this has been going on for about a month and a half for me and continues to get progressively worse.  Your description is IDENTICAL to what I have experienced.  I was recently diagnosed with Celiac's Disease which is a gluten intolerance so I wondered if this could be diet related.  I am 41 and otherwise have always been healthy.  I am not overweight, I have a very healthy diet and I exercise.  I am going to the Dr. tomorrow and plan to take your description with me because I could not have said it better myself.  I feel like I am going to come unglued if I can't get an answer and a good night's rest.  Please keep me posted on your test results and tests which your physician recommends.  I am desperate for some answers and hopefully a solution.  Thanks for your posting.  My husband found it and it brought a lot perspective.  I am sorry for your situation but am glad you shared this so I would not feel like the only one to ever have had this.  I have not been able to find out a whole lot about this which leaves me even more anxious about the situation.  Any ideas would be most appreciated.  dwc589
Avatar universal
Hi Bobito, hope you are feeling better now? Hi, Crystal_blue_girl, how are you doing? Can you provide some more details regarding the jerks you are going through - how often they occur and is it a continuous one or keeps repeating in an on and off pattern? Has any one observed whether these jerks you mention does continue even after you fall asleep? Is there anything that you do or it stops on its own? Usually, hypnic - sleep jerks or twitches are normal and can occur while you tend to fall asleep or when you try to wake up from sleep. You might also probably be suffering from severe stress and anxiety, which can also be a trigger factor. Also you might probably be having Rhythmic movement disorder. These can also be due to the side effect of the medicines you take. Avoid smoking, excessive coffee/tea and alcohol. So, it is better to consult a neurologist and sleep specialist for further evaluation. Take care and update on your progress.
Avatar universal
I just sent you a comment or two, but come to find out, the message did not take.  I will try again.  At the risk of being fatherly, I beg you not to come "unglued."  As I mentioned on my previous editorials, I have been experiencing this problem, off  and on, for about two years.  I used to become unglued.  I used to stare at the ceiling for hours, "listening" to my wife and my dogs, yes my dogs, sleeping so deeply and I felt benignly jealous.  I used to jump out of bed with a tremendous urge to scream:  "NOT FAIR!"  This did not help much.  In fact, it did not help at all.  It made matters much worse.  What I realized at one point was that the tremors themselves were only part of the equation to keep me awake.  The other part of the equation was the anxiety that was generated when the tremors appeared.  What has helped me tremendously is to think of nice, colorful events (I know it sounds corny) while I'm waiting to fall sleep.  When the tremors arrive, I simply try (I know it is very hard to do) to not panic.  By not panicking, fifty per cent of my problem is resolved.  I have found out that the tremors cannot intimidate me as much as they used to.  They are not really that "good" at keeping me awake without the assistance of the anxiety they create.  Anxiety gone, tremors are much, much weaker!   Besides this acceptance (not coming unglued), I have started to implement other practices to help me sleep without any medication.  I take a hot shower before going to bed, eat dinner at least three hours before going to bed.  Go to bed between 0930 and 1000.  This helps me in the following manner:  If I have been awake for three hours after going to bed, and I went to bed at 0930, I know I still have enough night hours left to get some sleep.  This reduces my anxiety level tremendously while I'm awake.  On the other hand, if I go to sleep at, say, midnight, and I don't fall sleep for three hours, there are not too many night hours left; thus, increasing my anxiety exponentially.  So I you can see, I have become a true believer that the self-induced anxiety is, to a great extent, as much of a culprit as my tremors.  I mentioned medication before. I'd like to address it again.  If I have not slept decently for two days or so, I do take a sleeping pill.  The anxiety created by that much lack of sleep cannot be overridden by pleasant thoughts.  I need to force my self to sleep--The pill does the trick.  Once I recapture my natural sleep patterns, I put the pills away and tried what I explained above.  So far it has worked for me nicely.  I have a sleep study scheduled in forty-five days.  I guess there are a lot of people in need in this department--I could not schedule it any earlier.  In the interim, my doctor, in conjunction with the resident neurologist gave me a battery of in-office test to determine whether I needed further neurological evaluation, i.e., brain scan or whatever.  They determined that there is nothing wrong with me neurologically.  This does not rule out further neurological evaluation.  All it means is that I can "afford" to wait for the results of the sleep study before taking any further steps in the neurological arena.  Is your sleep study taking place before mine?  I have faith that if we all keep up with informing each other on our conditions and improvements, we will all conquer this malady.  It is not the end of the world (here I go being fatherly again).  Allow me to share with you what my son said to me yesterday (he is a radiologist):  "Dad, we all bear a cross, FORTUNATELY yours is made of balsa wood when compared to the "things" I see everyday in my practice."  Whether he said this because he is sick and tired of hearing my sleeping complains or because he wants to make a philosophical point, is irrelevant.  The fact is that it made me realize that our problem is not "terminal."  There is lots of potential help out there which will become more readily available as soon as this studies and evaluation shed more light on it.  Hope you feel better after seeing your doctor and knowing that your sleep study has been scheduled--In short HELP IN ON ITS WAY.   I will definitely share with you the results of my study.  Let's hope all of us experiencing this malady keep on talking to each other.  This most definitely has a soothing affect--Every little bit helps.  Bobito
478095 tn?1210650359
Hi,Suri    Okay so you asked how often do they occur-They are on and of so in other words it doesnt happen everytime im asleep.Maybe like every other night.And like I said before it lasts like 10 sec. with no pause in between.You asked has anyone seen me have these in my sleep the answer is no cuz I sleep alone but I did wake my cat up once when I woke up with rapid movement in my arms they went all the way up and all the way down like three times and stoped which is a first and not one of my "normal" tremers. And they do stop on there own.Its strange its like when its happening I cant concentrate on anything so I cant even will it to stop.I read what you said about stress and anxiety and how that might be a factor but Ive had that from a verrrry early age so why would these things be happening now....Still confussed-Crystal
Avatar universal
Hi Bobito,
Thank you so much for all of the information which you shared regarding the tremors.  It has meant more than you know to find another person out there that can relate to this unnerving issue.  YOU are a good person for sharing this!  It has given me the hope I need at this time.  I am exhausted as I write this as my nights get worse each night it seems.  I had high hopes that I was going to have all kinds of good news to report to you because I made a trip to Whole Foods and bought all of these products that I was sure were going to impact this condition but to no avail...  I have a sleep study scheduled for Tues. Night and an appointment with an integrative health Dr. on Thurs.  Have you ever thought that this could be a brain tumor?  I feel preasure in my head but can't decide if it is just because my rhythms are so off right now and I am so tired.    I am an otherwise upbeat positive person and I certainly do not want this to take away my joy for life and living.  I will say that my perspective becomes so destorted with little or no sleep.   I have been doing some research on different nutrients and the effect on our bodies if we are deficient in them.  There are definitely some links but I have yet to figure this one out.
I will keep you posted as all of this unfolds.  Hopefully good news is waiting around the corner.  Best Wishes and THANK YOU!  dwc589
Avatar universal
Hi, Crystal_blue_girl, thanks for your reply and how are you? I suggest you need to get examined and investigated properly by a neurologist as your body jerks still continuing. Although it is strange, there might be possible rythmic movements causing you the jerks. It would be better if any of your family members can observe you for the jerks in sleep. There can also be sleep deprivation and stress might worsen this further. Relax and try to go to sleep as early as possible. You can also get a sleep study done. Take care and share your thoughts.
Avatar universal
Hi, dwc--I'd like to share the following opinions with you in reference to some of the points you have made.  First of all, I doubt very much, in my own humble opinion, that a brain tumor could be the culprit in our situation.  I think other body faculties would be affected as well, besides causing the tremors if a tumor was "involved."  When I don't sleep I get head discomforts, which I most definitely attribute to the lack of sleep.  I have learned in the last two years that lack of sleep can disturb the natural "rhythm" of my body as well as my mind to the point that I cannot reason things out as accurately as should be expected from a "normal" person.  This is all transitory--It all comes back as soon as I get some rest.  The following are my thoughts of what can possibly be causing our problem.  I have drawn these conclusions after gathering as much empirical data as possible.  This data comes from medical consultations, reading and simple gut feelings.  Thought #1:  Our problem can be caused by diet.  I just have this strong feeling that we are eating something that our brain simply does not appreciate.  In response to this I have started a journal of everything I eat every day.  Hopefully, when I get bad tremors I can go back to my journal and maybe, just maybe, there is a correlation between the two.  Thought #2:  Allergies--I am starting to realize that the worst of my problems manifest themselves during the spring time and early fall.  I am not taking any medication for allergies, for I have learned that those medications, among other things, can cause tremors and insomnia--something, for obvious reasons, I want to stay as far away as possible.  If my upcoming sleep study will fail to reveal any obvious conditions, I will talk to an allergist.  Thought #3:  Exertion.  As I have mentioned in my previous editorials, I ride my bicycle to work everyday (twenty miles round trip).  And many a time, I go riding with my buddies during the weekend--Sometimes for up to 100 miles in one weekend.  I'm sixty years and I think by body is asking me to slow down.  Well, I'm going to listen to my body--As of yesterday, I going to cut back my exercise routine by half.  This decision could not have come at a worse time, considering the price of fuel.  I'm going to ride my bike to work only three times a week.  I'll see how my body reacts to this.  Thought #4:  Plain anxiety.  I did mention this before, but I would like to readdress it.  The tremors wake us up, but I really believe that what keeps us awake is the anxiety we experience as a result of the tremors.  What has helped me tremendously is going to bed with the mindset that I’m going to be awakened by the tremors.  When the tremors “arrive,” I was expecting them.  In other words, they are not as much of a surprise any longer.  Again, this has helped me a great deal since it has reduced the amount of anxiety that is caused by the “unexpected’ tremors.  I’m pretty sure your sleep study will reveal a great deal.  I only wish mine was scheduled on Tuesday, as well.  Mine is not going to take place for another 40 days or so. Thought #5.  I think we could be experiencing some type of epileptic seizure, which only manifest itself when the brain is the sleeping mode.  The sleep study will clear this one up.  Just think how colorful things will be once your sleep study is conducted, and the answers start to pour in.  Just a few more days--hang in there, my friend—Good luck—Please keep in touch.  Bobito.
Avatar universal
Hi Bobito,
Thank you so much for all of your thoughts on this.  You definitely have a way of putting things into perspective for me as I am loosing my perspective with the lack of sleep.  This weekend  I tried an Ambion tablet for the first time ever...(I am very anti-drug as I can see you are also) It was not the control release just the regular.  My husband had them from work for international flights.  I went to bed at 8:30 because I was so exhausted and I awakened from my drug induced sleep at 12:45 a.m.  I then could not go back to sleep until 6:00 a.m and slept until 8:50... I think I am so afraid of having the tremors that my body has decided not to sleep at all...  Yesterday my husband and children were starting a garden and I decided to read in the hammock thinking how relaxing would that be to be surrounded by your family happily at work and the birds chirping etc...I was able to rest but never could go to sleep.  I have been awake for most of the night F,S,and S.  This morning my mom found an interesting report on www.adrenalfatigue.org/sleep_disorders.php which could be enlightening.  it souns like cortisol levels could be to blame.  Do you feel a little hungrey when you awaken with the tremors?  I am feeling hungry for the first time ever in the night.  Do you ever feel like you have an electric generater in your upper body as you try to go back to sleep?  The interesting link in this equation is that I usually feel peaceful when I go to bed but my body is way more agitated when I awaken which makes me think this could be blood sugar related.  Try to pull up that article and see what you think about some of the points made.  If you can't get it via the link I sent then try www.adrenalfatigue.org and then type in "sleep disorders."  Maybe we're onto something yet.  Your levels of bike riding I would think would be a very healthy thing for you but maybe because you exert so much in the day you need to supply your body with a healthy protein,  high quality fat and unrefined carbs as a small bedtime snack to see your body through the night.  It is in the article.   Hopefully we can have victory over these crazy tremors sooner than later.  Have a happy day!  dwc589
Avatar universal
Hi, dwc--How are you?  Did you have your sleep study last night?  I read your last post with great enthusiasm.  Yes, I do experience some hunger, but not when the tremors wake me up, but just before I go to bed.  Based on your recommendation, I'm going to eat a little something prior to bed.  Who knows,  just as you said, maybe we are onto something here.  Yes, I do feel like a miniature electric generator (very lucidly described) sits on my chest after I'm awakened.  This "generator" stays on for about 10-15 seconds, then it shuts off completely.  This happens every time the tremors wake me up. At any rate, thank you very much for recommending the article.  In fact, I might buy the book that the article is extracted from.  I'll keep you advised on this one.  Hope things are better with you--Keep in touch--Don't forget to share with us the latest on your sleep study.  I'm pretty sure a number of us are extremely interested to hear about it.  By the by, when I need to take a sleeping pill, I take "Restoril"--This one has the least number of negative side affects of all the pills I have been prescribed.  I read about it on the Web and found out that the U.S. Air Force prescribes this one to its pilots when they are afflicted by disturbances in their circadian rhythm.  I figure it must be pretty safe if the Air Force allows the pilots to use it--I hope!  Have a happy day. Remember to be happier everyday that goes by, for it means we are that one day closer to the day we are cured of this malady.  Bobito

Avatar universal
Hi Bobito,
I'm not sure what happened to my earlier posting  as I wrote quite a bit earlier today and it has now vanished...  as I said earlier so sorry for the delay in my response to you.  My week was quite trying.  On the night of  my scheduled sleep study my husband had to take our 11 year old daughter to the ER with chest pains.  I had taken her to the doctor the previous week and we thought it was reflux causing her heart to burn but on Tues she had the pain in PE which was concerning.  She is 40th percentile in her weight and very active so again no outward signs of problems.  Right before I went was asked to turn off my phone for the study to begin I found out that there was something showing up on her tests and that they would have to stay for further testing... That has all turned out fine we think now but can you imagine sleeping under those circumstances?  Especially since I was coming off my weekend of insomnia.  So the study was a bit of a disaster.  I slept for 45 min. the first half of the night and 30 minutes the second half of the night.  I have not yet gotten the results but wonder what will be concluded on almost no sleep.  Now I am taking Lorazapam which is an anti anxiety med. hopefully just for a week or so to get me back into a relax mode as I truly can not function on so little sleep.  It has helped to relax me but I am beginning to feel the tremors again.  I will meet with my integrative health doctor for the evaluation of my screening on Thurs. and I still would like to have a MRI to make sure all is well with my brain.  I just can not imagine what is causing this.  I will keep you up to date with my sleep study and other results as I receive them.  I can't tell you how much I have appreciated all of your thoughts and encouragement through this.  I look so forward to your sleep study to hopefully learn something for both of us.  So sorry to let us down on that one!  Keep me posted on any new findings!  Have a good night!  dwc589
Avatar universal
No, I cannot imagine being able to sleep under the conditions you have shared with me (your daughter's condition)--Even a human being with perfect sleeping patters could not have possibly slept under those conditions.  I take my hat off to you for the tremendous resilience and character you have demonstrated in bearing such an incredibly heavy "load" and still manage to move forward.  But as you can see, your daughter is going to be fine and you, in turn, will also be just fine once your study is analyzed.  Obviously, I am not in any shape or form an authority in sleep studies, but based on some readings I have done, there is no need for a long period of sleep in order to interpret one's condition during a sleep study--I can only guess that the fact that you managed to sleep for some period, it is enough for the electronic equipment (all the probes attached to you) to detect any anomalies in your sleep/awake modes.  You seem somewhat preoccupied with the existence of a brain tumor--for whatever is worth to you, I really don't think so.  I have gone that route as well.  I sincerely believe that when we are deprived of as much sleep as we have, we have a tendency to mentally wonder into tangents that are simply self-created because we are angry--Yes, angry!  Besides anxiety, we also feel anger at the fact that the rest of the world is "fine" and we are the only ones afflicted with a malady.  That's how we see the world around us--Everyone is just fine--Why are we the "only" ones with a problem?  Well, I must admit, nature is heartless but it (nature) has not set its cross hairs on just us.  Nature has its "guns" trained on everybody; it so happens that most people don't want to talk about how their lives really are or they simply are not lucky enough to find other people who endure the same system "malfunctions" so they talk to each other and find some solace in sharing.  We have found that solace and therefore we are better off than a lot of people in this world.  I took your advice and follow some of the steps in the article you recommended I read.  I have eaten a spoonful of peanut butter just before I go to bed.  Honestly, it has helped me.  It could be just coincidence (or the placebo affect kicking in), but I have been able to sleep about five hours a night for the last four days.  Could all this be purely psychological?--It could be, but I am going to continue eating my peanut butter until it ceases to be effective.  The tremors are mild, but I have still managed to sleep.  My only regret is knowing that I have yet to reciprocate this advise by helping you in some way.  I also have lost some of my postings.  I wonder where they go after you hit the "Post Comment" button.  I guess the same place where white goes when snow melts.  In order to remedy this situation, I have started to type my comments on a WORD document and then copy it into this site.  It has worked nicely--I have yet to lose another one.  Looking forward to hearing from you.  Warm regards, Bobito
Avatar universal
Hi, dwc--How are you?  Has your sleep study been "decipher?"  I' m feeling a bit better.  Still some shaken by the tremors, but I have gotten a little better at tolerating them.  Let us know how you are coming along.  Bobito
Avatar universal
Hi Bobito,
Sorry for the delayed response.  I have been preoccupied with myself and

my crazy sleep patterns as well as my daughter who is still having chest

pains.  I have been trying all sorts of things since we last spoke but

still have not found an answer for us.  I feel that my sleep study was

inconclusive since I never had the tremors during the night.  Because I

had insomnia it was just labeled "anxioty." I just am not thoroughly

convinced by this diagnosis when the study was incomplete.  Have you

found anything new that works for you in dealing with this.  With your

son's medical background does he have any ideas or theories?  I did talk

to a neighbor that had the night tremors three years ago and found that

it was hormonal. She was 41 at the time as am I now so I am now going to

investigate this avenue as well...not sure that helps you at all but I

would think that men undergo hormonal changes as well, we just don't

hear as much about them. How many more days until your sleep study?  I

am counting the days with you.  I wish I could have offered more insight

with mine.  The one interesting tid bit of info regarding the anxioty

theory is that I have been taking the Ativan also called lorazapam to

help me sleep and I still have the tremors on that "anti-anxioty" drug.

This puzzles me. I would think that the tremors would be non-existent on

the drug if it was indeed anxioty. I am able to fall back to sleep more

readily than without the med but the fact remains that the tremors are

still there.  By the way I did check the Adrennal Fatigue book out of

the library and it does not seem like the answer to the puzzle either.  

I love hearing your insight on things so keep me posted on your latest

discoveries.  I will try to be more prompt with my response.  I am so

thankful to have this dialogue since two heads are definitely better

than one!  Have a wonderful day and be sure to smile about all the GOOD!!!

Your friend, dwc589
Avatar universal
Hi, dwc--very nice hearing from you.  I was getting a bit concerned about your status.  Well, let me start with my sleep study.  It was supposed to take place next week, but that clinic discovered that I had been scheduled for a sleep study without an “interview” with a sleep specialist.  Thus, they gave an immediate appointment with the sleep specialist.  He reviewed my records and listened to my situation and determined that my problem was not a sleep problem.  He figured that if I’m able to fall sleep, which I am, and the tremors wake me up, which they do, it is a tremor problem that is causing my sleep problems.  It is not a sleep problem.  He feels that it is a heart problem of some sort that is causing the tremors.  I explained to him that I have had multiple cardiograms and 24-hour halters and they have revealed nothing but a very healthy heart.  He added that what I needed to have was what is called an “event monitor” to be carried for two weeks.  He said this is the only way to “smoke” out heart irregularities that escape the cardiograms and the 24-hour halters.  And that’s where my situation stands as of right now.  On Monday I’m going to the clinic to be fitted with one of those apparatus.  As far as my children are concerned, actually I have two and both are doctors.  One is a radiologist and the other one is a dermatologist.  To be honest with you, they don’t help that much.  The radiologist is extremely stoic and, consequently, very indifferent to compassion and kind advise.  The dermatologist, on the other hand, is very compassionate and goes out of his way to make me feel better with his “opinions”.  Bottom line:  All they really have is OPINIONS—In fact, my wife feels that they simply don’t know and, therefore, I should not ask them about it anymore—All that means, she added, is more opinions for me to have to psychologically and emotionally deal with.    One thing the dermatologist did about six months ago was to have a friend of his (a sleep specialist) called me and asked me about my situation.  His OPINION:  To have a sleep study administered.  I have decided to follow my wife’s advice.   At any rate, I have been able to sleep a little better—The tremors still there, but not as intense.  I have gone through this phase before—They may increase in intensity anytime.  I’m going for the event monitor—Who knows, it might reveal something of substance.  Needless to say, I feel pretty bad about your daughter—Neither you nor your daughter deserve this.  I’m pretty sure things will get better for all of us.  You mentioned about hormones—Yes, that’s all been checked.  Everything is fine in that department.  Thank your for bringing it up.  I will keep you advised if anything of substance develops—Most definitely, I will share with you the results of the event monitor.  Your friend, Bobito.
Avatar universal
Hi bobito, how are you doing? Hope you might be feeling better these days? Are you getting good sleep now or still you do have the jerks at night? Chronic fatigue and night muscle cramps can worsen it. Do keep physically active and physical therapy might be helpful. Also a gentle massage would soothe the aching muscles and give comfort to you. Hope to hear from you. Take care and share your thoughts.
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