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Young Stroke Survivors

Just wondered if there are any "young" stroke survivors out there. My very healthy athletic husband had an unexplained massive right side stroke Sept 2014 at age 47, (yah, no spring chicken I know, but still...) He got the TPA in time, however he had a bleed anyway causing more damage and an emergency craniotomy for the swelling. He is lucky to have survived but the stroke has taken it's toll on him, but he is fighting hard to make a comeback. Just curious if anyone else out there has had a similar experience or other right side stroke and how you are coping with recovery, life, etc. Spasticity, balance and left neglect remain challenging even though much progress has been made. Mostly still using wheelchair but he can do some walking with a 4 prong hemi cane.  Left arm/hand is slow to respond and hand won't function at all yet. Would love to hear how you or your family members are doing.
5 Responses
Avatar universal
hello Strokewife, my name is Christine, 48 years old, had a stroke shortly after my 48th bday on March 19th, not a spring chicken either, but a runner.Thought I   was invincible and Im talking to people as much as possible as the down time for me is hard, i used to be so busy, multi tasker and juggled two jobs which caught up to me... Ive been given a second chance, told my story on facebook and got alot of response.  IF  ONE person listened to me, then I got my point to accross.i told my friends to listen to  to their bodies and signals it gives and stress plays a huge part, which I  will tell you when you have the time.  my stroke affected my left side, i spent 3 weeks at a hospital, then, tranfererred to another hospital where I had physio, and occupational theraphy.  i slowly learned to use a cane but still using the wheelchair. My family is supportive, as sometimes I find it is I that has a difficult time accepting that I  cant do what I used to do before, SOMETIMES i struggle with getting up in the morning as my left side aches and eventually disappears later on in the afternoon, feeling sorry for myself is another emotional roller coaster I  Try not to feed,  My stroke affected my left leg, left arm and hand, and I  found when walking short distances in the house to move my legs, every time I step on my left foot, Im stepping on something softlike walking on clouds nothing like a hard surface like my right foot, does your husband have the same experience..you are doing a womderful job,, so is Your husband, i look at it as Everyday is a healing day,  in time, we will all look at this as a memory as our eyes have been opened to appreciate what life is relly about. I will be going to my first ou paient physio july 7th and 10th, another chaper in my life and will keep you posted... i know not to get too excited as it will be more of an assessment at the beginning... xoxo
Avatar universal
hello Strokewife, my name is Christine, 48 years old, had a stroke shortly after my 48th bday on March 19th, not a spring chicken either, but a runner.Thought I   was invincible and Im talking to people as much as possible as the down time for me is hard, i used to be so busy, multi tasker and juggled two jobs which caught up to me... Ive been given a second chance, told my story on facebook and got alot of response.  IF  ONE person listened to me, then I got my point to accross.i told my friends to listen to  to their bodies and signals it gives and stress plays a huge part, which I  will tell you when you have the time.  my stroke affected my left side, i spent 3 weeks at a hospital, then, tranfererred to another hospital where I had physio, and occupational theraphy.  i slowly learned to use a cane but still using the wheelchair. My family is supportive, as sometimes I find it is I that has a difficult time accepting that I  cant do what I used to do before, SOMETIMES i struggle with getting up in the morning as my left side aches and eventually disappears later on in the afternoon, feeling sorry for myself is another emotional roller coaster I  Try not to feed,  My stroke affected my left leg, left arm and hand, and I  found when walking short distances in the house to move my legs, every time I step on my left foot, Im stepping on something softlike walking on clouds nothing like a hard surface like my right foot, does your husband have the same experience..you are doing a womderful job,, so is Your husband, i look at it as Everyday is a healing day,  in time, we will all look at this as a memory as our eyes have been opened to appreciate what life is relly about. I will be going to my first ou paient physio july 7th and 10th, another chaper in my life and will keep you posted... i know not to get too excited as it will be more of an assessment at the beginning... xoxo
Avatar universal
There are many who have their strokes at far earlier ages than the two of you are--in their 30s, 20s, teens and even children.  I had my full carotid artery stroke at age 56--a bit older than the 2 of you are. That was about 6 years ago.  

This is not to take away from your grief about what has been lost.  I would so like to only have your disabilities which can be worked on.  I also had disability in my arm, hands and legs which PT helped a lot, but not totally. I still have disability.  More serious problems include my 24/7 severe migraines which are helped by many treatments, but I still need at least 12 hours of sleep a night or my migraines get terrible.  And sometimes they get terrible for no reason at all--ER time. I got myoclonus which gives me involuntary jerking of my whole body, now treated.  I have permanent kidney damage also caused by my stroke.  I have severely curled up toes--a spasticity caused by my stroke.  I have no appetite.  I used to be overweight before my stroke.  I got high blood pressure and hypothyroid levels--now treated.  And I got obstructive and central sleep apnea which I am unable to wear a CPAP machine--a whole another story. I am on a long list of medications.

So, perhaps this will help you to put your emotional roller coaster on straighter ground.  I have finally made peace with it, for the most part, by hearing about someone else with far worse stroke problems and learning to be grateful for all that I do have.

And again, this is not to take away from your grief.  It will be a process for all of you to deal with it.  I don't want to downgrade your significant problems. I remember my arm and hand experiencing terrible pain following my stroke--which PT finally took away the pain, but I never regained full use of them.

I hope that my posting may give you some additional perspective.  And maybe not.  You take care.  I do wish the best for all of you.
Sara
Avatar universal
Thanks for both your responses. Christine, my husband was also a runner, marathons, triathalons. He was the healthiest and most fit person I know. It's the strangest thing as he had no risk factors. He did however have untreated (ignored) sleep apnea which we are now finding out may be a link, and investigating further, and race dehydration being the only other possible explanation. The doctors really can't say.
He now has high blood pressure post stroke, up and down all over the place for no reason.

In several ways, you both sound very similar to him, with what is affected and what you can and cannot do, and what you have experienced so far, although I will obviously never ever know what you feel, physically or emotionally. We are all surviving this in different ways.

Sara, I am sorry to hear you have so many additional conditions with your stroke but I am glad to read many of them are treated and you have a very positive attitude. Thanks for sharing your stories, both of you. I hope your new outpatient therapy is going well Christine. Hard work does make a difference. Don't give up.
Keep in touch.
Avatar universal
Thanks for your kind response.  And I am so sorry about your husband's stroke effects.  Hopefully both your husband and Christine will regain much or all of it again.  Strokesurvivor, I appreciated your comment, "to appreciate what life is really about."  Sometimes it feels like all of my medical problems are a bit too much, but then I get to feeling better again.  So things are still hard, but I do appreciate what I have.  And strokewife, you are so right that hard work does make a difference and to not give up.  Thanks for both of your comments.  Sara
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