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prognosis after hemorrhagic stroke affecting the basal ganglia

What is the long term prognosis for a 78 yo suffering a hemorrhage ( 4-5cm) of the basal ganglia ( right side of brain)w/ left sided paralysis (severe) , limited aphasia, obvious cognitive and memory issues? At this time the person is two weeks post stroke. The information I have come across does  provide positive encouragement for rehab but does not provide time frames . For instance, if the person survives the first two weeks post stroke,will the person likely make it to the 30th day? 60th day?    It also seems as though the mortality rate differs within some of the articles. I know there are alot of variables with a stroke but over all what can we expect?
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10947 tn?1281407852
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Avatar universal
My sister, 57, had a stroke.  She is hooked up to IVs, is catherized, and can't drink or eat.  We are given the decision to pull all IVs and let nature take it's course or look for long-term nursing care.  She doesn't know who we are or where she is and just babbles like a baby.  Has anyone else been faced  with this decision?
Avatar universal
Hello,

I'm sorry to everyone in this situation - it is so tough.  My Mom, age 62, just had a basal ganglia hemorrhage.  We are facing the decision whether to engage Hospice or send her to a nursing home.  I'm curious how other people fared with this same situation, what prognosis you were given, and what was the result.  I too believe in miracles and looking for anyone who may have experienced one.

Thanks,
Chris
Avatar universal
Sorry about you Mom. Suffered a Left Basal Ganglia Hemorrhage on 6/29/2010 at the age of 42. It depend on the severity of your Moms stroke. But age of a person is a big factor. Have total numbness on my right hand, which more then likely will be permanent and have problems walking with my right side. Luckily for me I am left handed.
Told that it will take about 6-8 for some of the blood to be absorbed by the brain and that it is normal for stroke victims to sleep more then 12 hours per day. There also risk of seizers, "but hope not". It's also common for stroke victims to suffer from OCD after the stroke.
Taking walking for granted and learning to walk was the most  frustrating for me.
Wish you and Mom well.
1 Comments
Hi Leog1968,
M
Glad to hear u r better! My mom suffered a basal ganglia hemorrhage and everyone is saying she will be intubated forever and never be able to speak or understand. I was wondering  if you do end up reading this can we talk if you have time?
This is my email: ***@****
Thank you!
Avatar universal
Did you mean 6-8months for blood absorption? Never heard this before is this blood that was blocked by a clot?
Avatar universal
Hi, I have just stumbled accross your message from 2004, this is the same stroke my father has had and the same size, his condition sounds very familiar to what you have described. Can you tell me how well the 78 y.o  you described has recovered? if ther was recovery, how long did it take? Like you I am unable to come accross this information (time frames etc on the internet)
Thankyou
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