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Thyroid Cancer / Nodules & Hyperthyroidism Forum
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Avatar universal

Hypothyroid and Weight Loss

A family member has been diagonised with Hypothyroidism (T3 = 0.4), however, for the past sometim she has been loosing weight. All the research that I have done indicates Hypothyrodism with weight GAIN. Any thougths on this ?  
3 Responses
97953 tn?1440868992
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Would need to look at full thyroid panel, an isolated low T3 level is not clearly HYPO, but is suggestive.

Some hypo patients do lose weight and some hypers gain -- it's not all black & white.
Avatar universal
hi can you please what not to eat with hypothyried?
Avatar universal
I've read about soy products negatively affecting the thyroid. Mary Shomon says:
Researchers have identified that the isoflavones act as potent anti-thyroid agents, and are capable of suppressing thyroid function, and causing or worsening hypothyroidism. Soy is a phytoestrogen, and therefore acts in the body much like a hormone, so it's no surprise that it interacts with the delicate balance of the thyroid's hormonal systems. High consumption of soy products are also proven to cause goiter, (Anti-thyroid isoflavones from soybean: isolation, characterization, and mechanisms of action, Divi RL; Chang HC; Doerge DR, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079, USA, Biochem Pharmacol, 1997 Nov, 54:10, 1087-96) Isoflavones belong to the flavonoid or bioflavonoid family of chemicals, and are considered endocrine disruptors -- plants or other products that act as hormones, disrupting the endocrine system, and in some cases, this disruption involves acting as an anti-thyroid agent. (The grain millet, for example, contains high levels of flavonoids, and is commonly known as problematic for thyroid function). Flavonoids inhibit thyroid peroxidase (TPO), which disturbs proper thyroid function.
The March 1999 issue of Natural Health magazine has a feature on soy that quotes Daniel R. Doerge, Ph.D., a researcher at the Food and Drug Aministration's National Center for Toxicological Research. Dr. Doerge has researched soy's anti-thyroid properties, and has said "...I see substantial risks from taking soy supplements or eating huge amounts of soyfoods for their putative disease preventive value. There is definitely potential for interaction with the thyroid."

One UK study of premenopausal women gave 60 grams of soy protein per day for one month. This was found to disrupt the menstrual cycle, with the effects of the isoflavones continuing for a full three months after stopping the soy in the diet. Isoflavones are also known to modify fertility and change sex hormone status. Isoflavones have been shown to have serious health effects -- including infertility, thyroid disease or liver disease -- on a number of mammals.

Dr. Fitzpatrick believes that people with hypothyroidism should avoid soy products, because, "any inhibition of TPO will clearly work against anyone trying to correct an hypothyroid state." In addition, he believes that the current promotion of soy as a health food will result in an increase in thyroid disorders.

You can read more on this site I found:
http://www.thyroid-info.com/articles/soydangers.htm

You will also want to avoid cruciferous veggies.

Cruciferous vegetables

A second category of foods associated with disrupted thyroid hormone production is the cruciferous food family. Foods belonging to this family are called "crucifers," and include broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, mustard, rutabagas, kohlrabi, and turnips. Isothiocyanates are the category of substances in crucifers that have been associated with decreased thyroid function. Like the isoflavones, isothiocyanates appear to reduce thyroid function by blocking thyroid peroxidase, and also by disrupting messages that are sent across the membranes of thyroid cells.

Broccoli
Brussel sprouts
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Kale
Kohlrabi
Mustard
Rutabaga
Turnips

There you go. If you have problems with your weight, you might want to read up on the benefits of coconut oil. I've been using it for over a year now and haven't had any problems with my weight ever since. Here's a link if you're interested in reading about it.

http://www.coconutdiet.com/thyroid_health.htm

Best of Health and Happiness to you.

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