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Thyroid Cancer / Nodules & Hyperthyroidism Forum
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Avatar universal

Training for distance running...Thyroid trouble

Hello. Thank you for your help.  I am a 41yo woman with an excellent health history.  I started running athletically last year, I am training for a marathon.  I work in health care.  Recently I ran a long course and afterward experience symptoms similar to those I had when diagnosed with a goiter and hyperthyroid problems at the begining of my last pregnancy: increased heart rate, fatigue, headache, light sensitivity, anxiety.  I ran my own labs:  TSH = 0.384, Free T4 = 1.17, Free T3 = 3.0, and Antithyroglobulin antibody = 131.  My non-fasting triglycerides are at 44.  My symptoms were bad for about ten days, then improved and I have been feeling mostly better the past week, but not great.  I went for another long run today and felt O.K. but did not have nearly my normal level of energy.  I wear a heart rate monitor to track my running statistics and was surprised to find when I got home that my heart rate for the last third of my run jumped suddenly to consistently over 200 (max 240) compared to my normal 140 or so.  Again, I feel O.K. but not great and my heart rate is still a little high several hours later (85 vs. my normal 60-65).    

I realize my labs are somewhat subclinical.  I want to keep training.  I am a breastfeeding mom. Would you advise me to seek treatment?  Is it likely that I would be started on PTU?  Should I just wait and repeat my TSH if my symptoms worsen?  Will I cause muscle damage, or moreover, is it likely that I am endangering my health to continue training?  I have been trying L-Carnitine and have been thinking that it perhaps helps somewhat with the headache.  After my run today I am wondering whether I should be more concerned about my heart.  I'm at a point in my life when I really don't want to have to slow down and stop running if I can avoid it.  Thank you!
2 Responses
97953 tn?1440865392
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
The labs show only a mild abnormality at this point - would repeat before considering PTU or methimazole.  These levels are not abnormal enough to definitively explain the heart rate, but heart monitors will sometimes "act up" - so would not rely on the 200-240 bpm readings.
Avatar universal
A related discussion, Why can't I Run? was started.
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