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581310 tn?1253029550

Could I have FIbromyalgia with my Hashimtos

I got diagnosed almost 2 years ago with Hashimoto's. I have been on naturethroid during that time and my levels have been great. But I still have chronic headaches with urinary issues and pain in different parts of my body. My doctor thinks I could have Fibromyalgia because my hashi's has been treated and has normal levels now. Does anyone else have both these auto immune diseases together? If so what are you taking for the fibrolmyalgia.
2 Responses
Avatar universal
Levels that doctors pronounce as "normal" are frequently inadequate to relieve symptoms because the ranges are too broad for the thyroid hormones.  If you will post your thyroid test results and their reference ranges from the lab report, then members will be happy to help interpret if they are truly normal or could stand to be tweaked to relieve symptoms.
393685 tn?1425812522
In my opinion as a patient Fibro is a medical "term" of inflammation and something is causing it. In Hashimoto's - the present of inflammation is fact and the body inflames with the autoimmune condition.

Fibro is a symptom of having this disease and when the thyroid levels are balanced correctly the Fibro disappears for many Hashi patients.
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