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393685 tn?1425812522

Did you know there are "code" for doctors?

Happy Friday everyone. I have this information posted on a journal of mine about certain types of doctors that specialize in certain things. Hormone knowledge is tough to find and learning more on this A-4 rating may be helpful in finding someone to pin point your issues, Alot of questions seem to be rising up on this board and trying to locate a doctor that best suits your needs can be difficult. Take some time and research this line of doctors. It may help you - both male and female - in finding some answers you are looking for in hormonal balance with thyroid disease.

HAve a great day! - Stella5349

Please take a look at this below regarding your hormones.

Symptoms of Hormone Imbalance
Hormones have a profound effect on your everyday health and well-being.  Although present in only tiny amounts, hormones act on every cell of your body.  Hormones have individual affects, but also interact with each other to produce dramatic effects in the body.  Because of these interactions, they are able to trigger multiple body systems.

Types of Hormone Imbalance

There are a number of common symptoms associated with hormone imbalance(s):

Female hormone imbalance
The ovaries produce many hormones. Chief among them are estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone. The ovarian hormones estrogen and progesterone interact to coordinate a woman’s menstrual cycle during her reproductive years.  The brain produces the hormones follicle stimulating hormones (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) which trigger hormone production from the ovaries.  When any of the hormones coming from the brain or the ovaries are imbalanced, symptoms may occur.  Imbalances are most common in puberty and menopause, but imbalances can happen at any age.  Several conditions are well known to be associated with hormonal imbalance including: polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), endometriosis, breast disease, thyroid disease, and menstrual irregularities.

Symptoms of female hormone imbalance
Acne or oily skin
Bloating
Bone loss
Decreased fertility
Depression
Excess facial and body hair
Hot flashes
Heavy or painful periods
Irregular periods
Irritability
Loss of muscle mass
Loss of scalp hair
Low libido
Memory lapses
Mood swings
Nervousness
Night sweats
Poor concentration
Sleep disturbances
Tender or fibrocystic breasts
Urinary incontinence
Vaginal dryness
Weight gain


Male hormone imbalance
The testes produce nearly 95% of all male testosterone. The balance is supplied by the adrenal glands. They also produce small amounts of estrogen. The brain produces the pituitary hormones follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) which trigger hormone production from the testes.  As a man gets older, testosterone levels fall and estrogen levels tend to rise.  Lower testosterone levels may affect bone density, muscle strength, body composition and sex drive.  The imbalance that occurs when testosterone is low in relation to estrogen may also contribute to prostate problems.

Symptoms of male hormone imbalance
Bone loss
Decreased mental clarity
Decreased muscle strength
Decreased stamina
Decreased urine flow
Depression
Erectile dysfunction
Hot flashes
Increased abdominal fat
Increased urge to urinate
Irritability
Low sex drive
Mood swings
Night sweats
Poor concentration
Sleep disturbances

Conditions of Hormone Imbalance

Adrenal Imbalance
The adrenal glands produce three types of steroid hormones: glucocorticoids (cortisol), mineralocorticoids (aldosterone), and androgens (DHEA/DHEAS).  Cortisol enables the body to respond and adapt to the stresses of daily life.  It also helps to maintain blood sugar levels and promote a healthy immune system.  Aldosterone works to balance salt and water in the body. Androgens secreted by the adrenals provide the majority of DHEA for both men and women. For women, the adrenal glands are the major source of testosterone.  Imbalances in the adrenal system can contribute to problems with the nervous and immune systems, body composition difficulties, blood sugar irregularities, and high androgen levels.  

Symptoms of adrenal imbalance
Allergies / asthma
Arthritis
Bone loss
Chemical sensitivities
Morning/evening fatigue
High blood sugar
Increased abdominal fat
Memory lapses
Sleep disturbances
Sugar cravings

Thyroid Function Imbalance
Thyroid hormones control the body’s metabolism. The brain produces thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) which triggers the thyroid gland to produce two types of hormones – T4 and T3.  In hypothyroidism, the body has inadequate levels of  the thyroid hormones. This often leads to imbalances in relation to other hormones. Hyperthyroidism is a less common condition that exists when excess thyroid hormones are present.  Because every cell of the body is affected by thyroid hormones, symptoms of imbalances are often varied and affect multiple body systems.

Symptoms of low thyroid function
Brittle hair and nails
Cold temperature intolerance
Cold hands and feet
Constipation
Decreased sweating
Depression
Dry skin
Fatigue
Inability to lose weight
Low libido
Menstrual irregularities
Shortness of breath
Sluggishness
Weight gain

Symptoms of high thyroid function
Anxiety
Diarrhea
Eye/vision changes
Fatigue
Hair loss
Insomnia
Palpitations
Rapid heart beat
Sweating
Weakness
Weight loss

Insulin imbalance
Insulin is secreted by the pancreas.  Insulin “unlocks” the cells to allow glucose (sugar) from food to enter and be converted into energy.  When too much glucose is present in the body, the pancreas increases the amount of insulin being produced.  High insulin as well as high glucose may contribute to multiple symptoms. A number of conditions are associated with insulin and glucose imbalances and regulation problems. These include chronic stress, polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), coronary artery disease, high blood pressure, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes.


Symptoms of insulin imbalance
Abnormal blood cholesterol
Fatigue
High blood triglycerides
Increased abdominal fat
Increased hunger / sugar cravings
Low/high blood sugar
Poor circulation to extremities
Skin changes

Adult growth hormone deficiency
In childhood, growth hormone (GH) controls a child’s height. It is normal for GH levels to decline as a person reaches adulthood, but new research suggests that some adults may have too low a level.  Low levels of GH are linked to poor muscle tone, increase body fat, low energy levels, and cardiovascular changes.  GH insufficiency is associated with pituitary gland problems, brain injury, autoimmune disorders, and nervous system conditions.

Symptoms of adult growth hormone deficiency
Abnormal blood cholesterol
Bone loss
Decreased muscle mass
Decreased stamina and exercise ability
Fatigue
Increased abdominal fat
Increased risk of heart disease

Another useful tool to look at and how to find a doctor that looks these issues  as a specialist for proper hormone care and evaulation would be to find a doctor classified as a A-4 doctor, or endocrinologists. A-4 is the classification code of a doctor specializing in hormone replacements.  You can find out how to contact an A-4 doctor by goggling this . There is a national phone number provided to you to locate one near you.
4 Responses
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Avatar universal
Geez, I have almost all of these symptoms, and I blame it all on my thyroid disease. I went to the GYN a few days ago. She put me back on the pill for the menstrual issues - acne, bloating, blood clotting. I asked if it was safe for a 37-year-old to be on the pill. She said I could take it until I had menopause. She also said it won't interfere with thyroid meds if I take the pill at night and my thyroid meds in the morning.

I can't tell yet if the pill is working, but I'll let the forum know in a month or two.

:) Tamra
Helpful - 0
734073 tn?1278896325
I thought that "birth control" pills were not recommended for people w/ thyroi issues?
Helpful - 0
393685 tn?1425812522
Where in there is BC?
Helpful - 0
734073 tn?1278896325
She said her GYN put her back on the pill. I shouldn't assume I guess? All I know is that  I was done having kids (husband got "snipped" ) however periods were too heavy and too long, ( I'm probeably slightly hypothyroid Stella and don't even know it because I'm so focused on my daughters condition) so I got back on "THE PILL" for a while in my late 30's to help control "IT". Had lots af headaches so last Christmas I had a simple "out patient" procedure at my GYN's office (Uterine Ablation)(sp?) Sounds bad, but it's not. Nothing is removed and the excess uterine linning is eliminated. I had very little pain for two days (motrine and a hot pad took care of it), and now my period last for two days max and so light that I almost miss it!! I even gave my basket of super absorbent mega pads away! Oh Happy Day!!! So if you know you're done having kids, and you're sick of having your life controled by heavy bleeding, then I highly recommend this procedure to Tamera or anyone else out there!
Helpful - 0
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