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Avatar universal

Fatigue

hi,

i am a 30 year old and diagnosed with hashimoto's 2 yrs ago. i am a very active person, running marathons, etc. when i was initially diagnosed, my TSH was about 6.5 (ab in 100s/1000s). finally got on synthroid - my doc put me on 50mcg. this all happened after i finished the marathon when in the month i gain approximately 10lbs. i just finished another marathon and gained another 10lbs. never lost the first 10lbs - just remained a status quo for a couple of years. but my TSH went back up to about 4.7 and the doc increased the dosage to 75mcg. my biggest problem is that i am extremely fatigued, and have been for the last 2-3 years. i exercise because it energizes me for a couple of hours afterwards and i am competent enough to get something done in that period. i mostly contributed this to stress at work, my commute... but after reading some posts on the forum that  might not be the case. i cant lose a pound, irrelevantly of the exercise... does anyone have any recommendations? fatigue is just killing me...  
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314892 tn?1264623903
Have you had the TSH, freet4 checked since you started the 75 mcg dose?
How long ago did you start that dose?
Maybe it hasn't taken effect yet or the TSH will still be too high for you.
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Avatar universal
i just started this week. it will take a couple of weeks before it kicks in. my doc never checks the freet4, but i think last time it was checked it was normal (1.1), but that was 2 yrs ago (Dec 05).  
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Avatar universal
How are you now?  I can relate.
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Avatar universal
First thing you need to do is find a good thyroid doctor.  Any doctor that relies on TSH to diagnose and treat a hypo patient is not going to get you feeling well.  TSH is a pituitary hormone that is supposed to accurately reflect levels of the biologically active thyroid hormones, Free T3 and Free T4 (not the same as Total T3 and T4).  In reality, TSH  cannot be shown to correlate well with either Free T3 or Free T4, much less with symptoms, which are the most important consideration.  

Free T3 is the most important test because scientific studies have shown that Free T3 correlated best with hypo symptoms, while Free T4 and TSH did not correlate at all.  Many members, myself included, say that symptom relief required Free T3 in the upper third of its range and Free T4 around the middle of its range.

A good thyroid doctor will treat a hypo patient clinically by testing and adjusting Free T3 and Free T4 as necessary to relieve symptoms, without being constrained by resultant TSH levels.  You can get some good insight into clinical treatment from this letter written by a good thyroid doctor for patients that he sometimes consults with after initial tests and evaluation.  The letter is then sent to the participating doctor of the patient to help guide treatment.  In the letter, please note the statement, "the ultimate
criterion for dose adjustment must always be the clinical response of the patient."

http://hormonerestoration.com/files/ThyroidPMD.pdf

So, I suggest that you should go back and request to be tested for Free T3 and Free T4, along with TSH.  Also since hypo patients are frequently too low in the ranges for Vitamin D, B12 and ferritin, you should also request those as well.  If the doctor resists, just insist on all these tests and don't take no for an answer.  When results are available, please get a copy of the lab report and post results and their reference ranges shown on the report and members will be glad to help interpret and advise further.

One last thing.  If you will give us your location perhaps a member can recommend a good thyroid doctor based on personal experience.



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649848 tn?1534633700
COMMUNITY LEADER
This is a very old thread, started in 2007, and I doubt whether Krazikroat will respond.
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Avatar universal
OMG  I did not look past the last post and notice the age of the thread.  Sure sorry I wasted all that time on my response.  
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