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Grave's Disease and Hashimoto's Disease

Has anyone else been diagnosed with both Grave's Disease and Hashimoto's Disease?  About 15 yrs ago I was put on thyroid meds, very low dose, but was never diagnosed with Hashimoto's.  Took it for about 3 yrs and then my dr said my reading was fine and took me off of it.  Now 15 yrs later everything is out a wack with EVERYTHING and I've been diagnosed with Grave's Disease.  At this time the Grave's is winning out and messing with my heart.  I'm taking Tapozole 10 mg, 4x a day, to get my TSH readings up from ZERO so I can have surgery to remove thyroid.  Has anyone else had the TT and do you feel better afterwards?  I understand I will always have these diseases, does this surgery help the symptoms go away?  You'd think if I have both they'd even each other out, right!??  haha.  If I have the surgery with these diseases continue to fight the remaining little bit of tissue I have left there of the thyroid?  Would having radiation after surgery get rid of the rest of the thyroid and get these diseases to leave my body alone!??? This is all confusing. I'm so tired of these adrenaline rushes I get. Then throw psoriasis in with it, it's just hunky dorey!!    
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Avatar universal
I "only" have Hashi's, but let me give you some information, and hopefully, someone else will chime in with personal experience.  

You say that you were never diagnosed with Hashi's, and I tend to think you never had it.  Hashi's destroys thyroid function, and your thyroid seems to still be able to produce thyroid hormones just fine.  Do you have results of antibody tests (TPOab, TGab and TSI)?  If so, please post them with reference ranges (they vary lab to lab, so you have to post both together).

After a TT, you will be permanently hypo, and you will have to take replacement hormones daily for the rest of your life.  The Graves' symptoms you are experiencing now should be eliminated, but they will be replaced by hypo symptoms.  Once meds are adjusted properly for you (this process can take quite some time), however, you should be symptom free.

Helpful - 0
5759007 tn?1373735492
I hope you are considering alternatives - there is no way back from TT.

I can't even begin to understand what you are going through - but I do understand Graves and Hashimotos.  My paternal grandmother had Graves, my mother has Hashimotos, and now my numbers are off and my doctor is thinking Hashimotos, but wants to put me on replacement hormones without doing TPOab (I am insisting on the test first, of course).

Back to you... this may not be a popular response, but here's my two cents.  Just for the record, medical cannabis is legal in my State and I do not condone doing anything illegal.   That said, before I do anything drastic, I have decided that I am going to try medical cannabis oil.  I have been doing a lot of research on these diseases, and I have come across some interesting data, as follows:

1.  "CB1 (Endocannabinoid) receptors are abundantly present on nerves in the brain that are involved in the hypothalamis-pituitary-thyroid axis.  The distribution of CB1 receptors in the brain suggests that they may influence BOTH EXCITATORY AND INHIBITORY inputs on this system"  i.e. cannabis may be able to help regulate our thyroid feedback loop!?  http://www.medicann.com/conditions-and-diseases/medical-cannabis-and-the-thyroid-gland/  This page also contains responses to the article that serve as annecdotal (personal experience) evidence confirming this.

2.  "The fact that both CB1 and CB2 (Endocannabinoid) receptors have been found on immune cells suggests that cannabinoids play an important role in the regulation of the immune system.  Recent studies demonstrated that administration of THC into mice triggered marked apoptosis in T cells and dedritic cells, resulting in immunosuppression.  In addtition, several studies showed that cannabinoids downregulate cytokine and chemokine production and upregulated T-regulatory cells as a mechanism to suppress inflammatory responses."  From the National Institutes of Health article "Cannabinoids as Novel Anti-inflamatory Drugs" found at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2828614/   i.e.  cannabis may be able to help REGULATE our immune system (bye, bye immune deficiencies and autoimmune diseases?)

3.  From the same National Institutes of Health Article:  "in vitro (in test tube experiments), THC and other cannabinoids could induce apoptosis in transformed murine and human T cells, including primary acute lymphoblastic human leukemia cells."  In a xenograft model of thyroid cancer, substances that blocked endocannabinoid degradation also increased the levels of AEA and 2-AG in the tissue and reduced tumor growth."  "Moreover, many animal studies have reported antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of cannabinoids on tumor cells BUT NOT ON NORMAL TISSUE."    This article is amazing!  If you can read a scientific journal article, read this one.   It basically says, Hey world, cannabis kills cancer, regulates the immune system, relieves or reverses damage from autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, colitis, and hepatitis!

4.  One last kicker....  There was a study done on "the influence of chronic cannabis abuse on thyroid function"   -- someone thought that all those potheads may be hurting their thyroids, and decided to study it!   Guess what the results were?   "ALL of the tested patients were found to have TSH, total T3, and free T4 levels within the population reference range"  Their conclusion? One sentence: "These results argue against a relevant influence of chronic cannabis intake on thyroid function in humans"
OK, so they got mud on their face, and their conclusion shows it.  But does anybody else find it interesting that, in a world where thyroid disorders are not really that unusual, ALL of the tested patients had normal thyroid levels?  ALL?  Really?  Did the doctors who did this study have so much mud on their face that they missed that?    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22821384  

Maybe we should give it a try before we resign ourselves to thyroid replacement therapy for the rest of our lives.  After all, if it doesn't work, we can still use those lifelong hormone therapies.

See also this YouTube video on the Rick Simpson story http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JsuradmaMO0     very interesting stuff.

While I haven't tried taken medical marijuana internally yet, my cousin has a sample topical muscle relief spray (in isopropol alcohol) that he got from a dispensary here.  I happen to have a very sore ankle (sprained very badly eight weeks ago, still healing) and he sprayed it three times to cover my ankle last night.  Within about two minutes the surface pain was subsiding, and after about ten minutes, the entire ankle was pain free and mobile enough to properly stretch it.  Lasted about two hours then started to wear off, but I woke up this morning it was not inflammed as it normally is, and although it is back to being sore, I think I slept better last night than I have in two months!   And no, topical use does not get you high -- not even a little bit!  I'm sold on that- topically it should be legal for everyone to use;  OTC!

Good luck to you Donna,  sorry it is such a long reply, I just figured that a lot of people wouldn't even consider such a move, but on consideration, it seems like a no-brainer to me.  What do we have to lose, really?   It is, of course, a personal decision, and it may not be legal in your area;  but I would suggest you research it further, as I am going to do.
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Avatar universal
Do you tried . Does it help you how much doses to do you take for cannabis oil.
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