Aa
A
A
A
Close
Thyroid Disorders Community
26.1k Members
Avatar universal

Hashi's and can't exercise without getting sick

I'm new here, recent diagnoses with Hashi's about 5 months ago, 49 yrs old. Still working towards the right meds and dose, currently on armour and it seems to be doing better than levothyroxine. Thought I was doing much better as on levo I couldn't exercise at all without getting debilitating flu symptoms, achy, fatigued, etc. Would take 5 days to recover from too much activity. Started to get better with armour then last week got the flu symptoms again and crawling my way out.
What I would love to hear about is how normal this kind of thing is and are there any of you out there that have positive stories of going through this but ultimately getting better? It will be easier to have patience if I hear something optimistic that I will get my life back eventually.
thanks
4 Responses
798555 tn?1292787551
Sore, stiff muscles happen to some hypothyroidians after exercise. T3 helps, magnessium glycinate or taurate is one of the best magnesium types for muscle pain - other types dont work as well. Magnessium citrate is the second best but effects bowls more.

Its important to have the correct hormone level, need to be optimal. Not just in range. Most feel best on natural thyroid med with Free T3 in the upper third of the range despite the low TSH this can create.

If you exercised for years and had injuries while hypothyroid but were not yet diagnosed, this can damage muscles making adhesions causing more pain even after taking thyroid med.

Fatigue is another hypo symptom or not enough thyroid med. Still some just arte not like they used to be and need B vitamins , plus vitamin D-25 test should be 50 or higher.

I never really thought of these symptoms being similar flu symptoms. Sick VS sore and tired are two different things to me. Hypo doesnt make your nose run.
798555 tn?1292787551
Forgot to add. Creative stretching is very important for hypothyroid people experiencing body pain. Using a foam roller and a tennis balls or soft ball to roll over muscles (roll on floor) to break up muscle adhesion and small knots helps in upper legs, glutes, hips and lower back. U-tube for ideas.

In extreme cases Chiropractors or Physical therapists that practice trigger point release (static) and Active Release (moving) can break up muscle adhesion that cause the pain. It works to some extent for most people.
Avatar universal
Thanks for the comments, nice to know someone is reading these things. When I say flu-like symptoms it is about as close as I can get to explaining the debiliatating achy sensations--really kind of different than just being sore. I am have been very physically active and kinesthetically aware for a long time and have a great deal of familiarity with soreness. The achy problem really is more about aching--kind of like my muscles and joints desperately aching for some kind of relief. That combined with the fatigue is very similar to me with aspects of the flu, and although there generally is no runny nose or fever there does generally seem to be a mucus related component as well as occasional mouth sores.
I do quite a bit of stretching and that helps so nice to be reminded and encouraged to do that. Anyway, thanks for taking the time to respond.
Avatar universal
Just wanted to respond to the comment "Thanks for the comments, nice to know someone is reading these things."   Lots of us are reading and waiting for the answers too. We are just to timid to even write, much less confront the Dr.   Thanks for posting your situation.
Have an Answer?
Top Thyroid Answerers
649848 tn?1534633700
FL
Avatar universal
MI
1756321 tn?1547095325
Queensland, Australia
Learn About Top Answerers
Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
We tapped the CDC for information on what you need to know about radiation exposure
Endocrinologist Mark Lupo, MD, answers 10 questions about thyroid disorders and how to treat them
For people with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), the COVID-19 pandemic can be particularly challenging.
A list of national and international resources and hotlines to help connect you to needed health and medical services.
Here’s how your baby’s growing in your body each week.
These common ADD/ADHD myths could already be hurting your child