Aa
Aa
A
A
A
Close
Avatar universal

Hypocalcemia

I was diagnosed with thyroid cancer about 4 years ago and had a total thyroidectomy at the time. During the majority of 2008 I was unable to afford my medication and would take less than the recommended dosage. During this time I began to feel symptoms of hypocalcemia. The tingling, burning sensation, the muscle spasms and so on. However, my blood test have shown normal calcium levels. I'm currently take my medication as prescribed, but I still have these symptoms. So I'm wondering if long term hypothyroidism can cause hypocalcemia and if a person could have hypocalcemia when calcium levels are within normal range on regular blood test? Or is there a special blood test which test for hypocalcemia?
4 Responses
Sort by: Helpful Oldest Newest
Avatar universal
Wow, thanks a lot. I couldn't understand why I felt this way if my calcium levels are normal. Now I have a better idea and I will be talking to my doctor about this.

Thank you so much, I really appreciate it.
Helpful - 0
523918 tn?1244549831
Just got this one:
There is A SITUATION Where you have low calcium and lab values are normal:
Hypoalbuminemia can reduce serum calcium levels above normal even if ionized calcium looks normal (so ask your doctor to test albumin in serum). But Magnesium storage can also be low because of the long term hypocalcemia.   Hypomagnesium can be a cause of hypocalcemia.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Thanks so much for taking the time to answer my question. I'm going to speak with my endo about magnesium deficiency.
Helpful - 0
523918 tn?1244549831
Your calcium is ok, I would suggest taking magnesium (long term hypocalcemia can cause low Magnesium). Make sure your TSH is ok.
Helpful - 0
Have an Answer?

You are reading content posted in the Thyroid Disorders Community

Top Thyroid Answerers
649848 tn?1534633700
FL
Avatar universal
MI
1756321 tn?1547095325
Queensland, Australia
Learn About Top Answerers
Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
We tapped the CDC for information on what you need to know about radiation exposure
Endocrinologist Mark Lupo, MD, answers 10 questions about thyroid disorders and how to treat them
Herpes sores blister, then burst, scab and heal.
Herpes spreads by oral, vaginal and anal sex.
STIs are the most common cause of genital sores.
Condoms are the most effective way to prevent HIV and STDs.