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Peanut butter and thyroid.......

So in another post, someone mentioned that peanuts should be avoided when you are on thyroid meds. I am a peanut butter junky. Could eating this every day be causing some of my problems I mentioned in a previous post?
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Avatar universal
Hi Pattyisha,
Unfortunately, yes. I used to love peanuts, and peanut butter, but had to give them up. Have you tried Almond butter ? Hazelnut ? Trader Joes sells different kinds of nut spreads. You might like some of those in place of peanuts.,
Here are other Foods NOT TO EAT recommendations for Thyroid Sufferers

CERTAIN VEGETABLES AND NUTS
While vegetables supply valuable amounts of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and fiber, certain varieties may hinder thyroid function.
For this reason, the University of Maryland Medical Center suggests avoiding cruciferous vegetables, such as cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, turnips, cassava, soybeans and mustard greens.

Nuts provide healthy fats, protein and a variety of helpful nutrients. Avoid peanuts, peanut butter and pine nuts, however, as they too may dampen thyroid function.
Helpful - 1
Avatar universal
Hi! I know your post is a year old but I needed to see if you're still having the symptoms? Do you know what your TSH was before you were on Armour? I have many questions especially with the throat and air hunger.
Paula
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
I eat peanut butter and trail mix A LOT ...

No issues for me...TT 20yrs ago.

Everyone is different in how they react.
Helpful - 0
649848 tn?1534633700
COMMUNITY LEADER
Your doctor is only looking at the FT3 as being "in range", which we know isn't good enough. It needs to be high enough in the range to alleviate hypo symptoms, without causing hyper symptoms.

I'm not the least bit surprised that you didn't feel much after only one B12 shot.  Typically, B12 shots are done weekly for a month, then monthly after that, if still needed.  Fatigue will not be eliminated on just one shot. Like so many other things, it has to build in the system a bit, to make a difference. On top of this, you're still hypo, which also causes fatigue.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Just wanted to give you this info on how a good thyroid doctor would respond to your symptoms and Free T3 level.  Also would be a good idea to test for ferritin, since hypo patients often find it too low in the range.

A good thyroid doctor will treat a hypo patient clinically by testing and adjusting Free T3 and Free T4 as necessary to relieve symptoms, without being constrained by resultant TSH levels.  You can get some good insight into clinical treatment from this letter written by a good thyroid doctor for patients that he sometimes consults with after initial tests and evaluation.  The letter is then sent to the participating doctor of the patient to help guide treatment.  In the letter, please note the statement, "the ultimate
criterion for dose adjustment must always be the clinical response of the patient."

http://hormonerestoration.com/files/ThyroidPMD.pdf
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Avatar universal
Barb~I went to my naturopath and was given a b-12 injection that did not seem to help.  I go back to see her in just under a month.  When I talked to her about my T3-she thought it was fine for not having taken my meds before the labs.  I'll try to get her to change her mind though.  I'm about done with this fatigue and hair loss:) not to mention everything else.

I am on Vitamin D 4,000/day.  I'll try the selenium to see if it helps.

I can't begin to express my gratitude for the information that you all provide:)

Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
I didn't realize you were a fellow Oregonian until you mentioned OHSU.

I'd just add a couple of comments.  Have you tried selenium for the feeling that something is stuck in your throat?  Some people find that it reduces the feeling of swelling or fullness in the thyroid area.  If you take selenium, be sure to follow label directions since it can be toxic in too high doses.

Once again, I agree with Barb that your labs, especially your FT3 leave plenty of room for improvement.  Your B-12 level needs work.

The peanut butter?  I doubt it's impacting your thyroid function a lot because your FT4 is not too bad, especially for someone on Armour.  However, it could be contributing to inflammation in your thyroid and that feeling that something is stuck in your throat.  Perhaps it would be worthwhile to eliminate it for a week or so.  If the feeling is still there, you'll know you can enjoy your peanut butter guilt free.  

Armour and all desiccated is measured in mg or grains (1 grain = 60 mg); synthetics are measured in mcg.
Helpful - 0
649848 tn?1534633700
COMMUNITY LEADER
Your FT4 isn't "horrible", at 40% of the range, but there's plenty of room for improvement, since rule of thumb is for it to be around mid range.

Your FT3 is pretty dismal, at only 26% of the range; rule of thumb is to upper 1/2 to upper 1/3 of range.

I can see why you have hypo symptoms.

Additionally, your B12 level is lower in the range than many of us can tolerate.  I, personally, have to keep my B12 level right near the top of the range, in order to keep from feeling fatigued and wanting to sleep, all the time. I also bruise pretty easily, when my B12 levels are down, plus I get numbness/tingling in my feet/hands.

Are you supplementing vitamins B12 and D?
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Avatar universal
I've not had RAI, i am on armour with a total of 115mg (mcg?)spread throughout the day. This is my post from previously;

Hello again, it's been a while since I've posted but I still frequent this board as it is so helpful.

I recently had my labs drawn again, just trying to keep on top of things but have some hypo signs such as hair loss, fatigue, difficult weight loss.  I go in to see my Naturopath this week to discuss the labs with her but wanted to get opinions from here to be ready with questions.

These labs were drawn on July 26th before I took my morning dose of Armour.  Also, I have Hashi's just FYI.

TSH .13 range (.40-4.5)
T4, Free 1.2  (.8-1.8)
T3, Free 2.8 (2.3-4.2)
B12 447 (200-1100)
D 52 (30-100)

Some other issues I've been dealing with are the feeling that something is stuck in my throat, air hunger and difficulty breathing sometimes.  I also feel like i have bronchitis at times but no fever or sickness.  I think if I could just cough really hard, something would come up but it doesn't help.  I've been to an ENT and a gastro for an endoscopy but neither Dr could find anything.  I've been referred to a throat Dr at OHSU but I'm not sure if that is where they should be looking.

I look forward to reading your thoughts and opinions.  You people are so knowledgeable! ;)
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
I agree with Barb.  

I think the answer to your question hinges partially on what the problems are that you mentioned in a previous post.  Perhaps you could cut and paste them here so we all have them readily available.

What is your thyroid condition?  Are you on meds?  Do you still have a thyroid?  Have you had RAI?  Do you have autoimmune thyroid disease?
Helpful - 0
649848 tn?1534633700
COMMUNITY LEADER
I disagree that you have to completely avoid peanuts, peanut butter or cruciferous veggies.  

Goitrogenic properties of cruciferous vegetables are broken down with cooking. The benefits of eating fresh veggies, far outweighs the disadvantage.  

Most of us find that changing diet is not necessary, so long as foods are eaten in moderation.  Anything eaten excessively can adversely affect your health.  

You can try eliminating these foods and see if it helps your symptoms, but don't be surprised if it doesn't.
Helpful - 0
1 Comments
I am curious to know if you have hypothyroidism, Hashimoto's, Thyroid nodes or goiters?
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