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TSH level 7

I am taking synthorid (leventhroxine) and just had a blood test this week.  My TSH level is 7.  Does that mean I should see my family doctor to adjust my levels?
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Avatar universal
Hi Sue1818, my TSH was 4.55 and my ENT specialist put me on 50mcg of Levothyroxine(synthroid). My research so far indicates the TSH is supposed to be with in range, but perferrably low in a normal range (sorry I don't have exact numbers on-hand). Also, it takes a very slow month to get into your system, lol. A repeat of labs also is needed often to dial in the right dosage for you.  Hope this helps, I'm just starting to familiarize myself with TSH too.  :)  
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Avatar universal
Sue1818, forgot to mention but thought it might help...  I found levothyroxine for 4 dollars at Kroger pharmacy, I think Meijers and Target has a generic list as well.  Hope this helps.  :)
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Avatar universal
If your TSH is 7 then you need an increase in Synthroid.
See your Doctor, get your labs done and then he/she will increase the synthroid.
The levels here in Australia for TSH are : 0.50 - 4.00 although I am comfortable when my levels are around the 2.00 mark.
Any lower and I feel hyper.
Because of super drug sensitivity, thyroxin works fast on me and I was having fortnightly bloods when hypo after RAI.
I usually know now when you have bloods done by my symptoms.
But get yours checked and ask your Doctor what dosage to go up to.
I am currently on 62.5mcg thyroxin 3 times a week and 50mcg 4 times a week and tweaking my meds to get the right balance for me.
Hope that helps you.
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