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Avatar universal

hight Total T3 but everything else is normal.

I have normal TSH and T4 and Free T3 but high Total T3 with levels above 400. It was tested 3 times but they just keep ignoring it saying its nothing. just incase it matters I have the following as well
C-REACTIVE PROTEIN levels are High
High Testosterone
high glucose but not diabetic or pre-diabetic
ANTI-NUCLEAR detected but could not find anything in follow up test. also checked 3 times.
low Vitamin D
6 Responses
Avatar universal
Please post all your test results and reference ranges shown on the lab report.  Also, please tell us about any symptoms you have, since symptoms are more important for diagnosis than thyroid related test results.    
1 Comments
Symptoms: Unexplained Weight gain, Fatigue, Depression, Joint and back pain, Weakness, Dry skin and overall don't feel well.

T3, TOTAL                                     425 ng/dL      Reference  97 - 169 ng/dL
C-REACTIVE PROTEIN            38.5 mg/L       Reference  <=10.0 mg/L
VITAMIN D, 25 OH, TOTAL     19.4 ng/mL    Reference  30 - 80 ng/mL
GLUCOSE                                      123 mg/dL      Reference  60 to 100 mg/dL
TESTOSTERONE, LC-MS         58 ng/dL         Reference 9 - 55 ng/dL
ANTI-NUCLEAR                         Detected          Reference Not Detected


everything else was in their normal ranges
Avatar universal
Symptoms: Unexplained Weight gain, Fatigue, Depression, Joint and back pain, Weakness, Dry skin and overall don't feel well.

T3, TOTAL                                     425 ng/dL      Reference  97 - 169 ng/dL
C-REACTIVE PROTEIN            38.5 mg/L       Reference  <=10.0 mg/L
VITAMIN D, 25 OH, TOTAL     19.4 ng/mL    Reference  30 - 80 ng/mL
GLUCOSE                                      123 mg/dL      Reference  60 to 100 mg/dL
TESTOSTERONE, LC-MS         58 ng/dL         Reference 9 - 55 ng/dL
ANTI-NUCLEAR                         Detected          Reference Not Detected


everything else was in their normal ranges.  

Avatar universal
Just being within range is inadequate info.  Please post actual TSH, Free T4 and Free T# results and ranges.
1 Comments
TSH, 3RD GEN                 1.97 mIU/L    Reference 0.47 - 4.68 mIU/L
T4, FREE                            1.03 ng/dL     Reference 0.78 - 2.19 ng/dL
T3, FREE                             3.1 pg/mL      Reference 2.2 - 4.2 pg/mL
Avatar universal
TSH, 3RD GEN                 1.97 mIU/L    Reference 0.47 - 4.68 mIU/L
T4, FREE                            1.03 ng/dL     Reference 0.78 - 2.19 ng/dL
T3, FREE                             3.1 pg/mL      Reference 2.2 - 4.2 pg/mL
Avatar universal
Not an area I know much about, but I think the tests for C-reactive protein and ANA nuclear are indicative of some kind of inflammation.  In trying to assess your thyroid status, the most important indicator is always an evaluation for multiple symptoms that occur more frequently with hypothyroidism.  You have a number of those you listed.   Except at extreme levels TSH reveals very little about your thyroid status.   Your Free T4 of 1.03 is only at 18% of the range, which is too broad and skewed to the low end.  So that means your FT4 is lower than needed by most people.  Your Free T3 of  3.1 is 45% of its range, which is a bit lower than needed by many people.  Your FT3 being significantly higher in range than your FT4 is an indication that your body is converting more T4 to t3 in an effort to maintain thyroid function as best possible.   I don't have any explanation for the high Total T3, but Red_Star gave you one possible explanation.    Your Vitamin D is way too low.  It is very important to supplement with 2000 IU of D3 daily, or as needed to  to get to at least 50 ng/ml.   It is also very important that you get tested for B12 and ferritin.  B12 should be in the upper part of its range, and ferritin should be at least 100.

Your doctor is wrong about your symptoms being due to depression.  Your symptoms and FT4/FT3 test results point to hypothyroidism; however, before trying to get the doctor to prescribe thyroid med, to raise your FT4 and FT3 levels, it might be best to talk with the doctor about possible causes for the high Total T3, and C-reactive protein, ANA tests, and your relatively low levels of FT4 and FT3.   Also would be good to test for Total T4, TBG, and B12 and ferritin.    So what I am suggesting is to talk about all this with the doctor and try to get answers about all  test results.  If there is underlying cause(s) that can be fixed, it seems that would be a better approach than just going on thyroid med right away.  

Of course the most important thing for you is to find a good thyroid doctor.  That does not necessarily mean an Endo, but in your case it might be a good idea if you can find an Endo that is a good thyroid doctor.    We can also try to help with that if you will tell us your location.  
Avatar universal
Your doctor is running tests and then ignoring the results. With your doctor ignoring C-reactive protein (CRP) 4 times normal and total T3 (TT3) about 3 times normal, I'd say your doctor is not serving you well.

High CRP is indicative of inflammation or infection. If you search on high CRP and thyroid you will find the following: High CRP has been found in sub-acute thyroiditis (SAT), but not in Graves disease (paper #1) or Hashimotos disease (paper #2).  Subacute thyroiditis (SAT) is an acute inflammatory disorder of the thyroid gland most likely due to viral infection, characterized by painful toxic goiter with systemic inflammation. (from paper #2)

Anti-nuclear (ANA) indicates the possibility of an autoimmune disorder. Graves disease and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis are common autoimmune thyroid diseases. The following tests are used to detect thyroid autoimmune disease: anti-thyroperoxidase (TPO), anti-thyroglobulin (Tg) and anti-TSH receptor antibodies.

Your doctors should be making every effort to locate the source of any infection. I think that you should demand that your doctor refer you to an endocrinologist or other good thyroid doctor as soon as possible.

Paper #1
Significant role of serum CRP in differentiating inflammatory from non-inflammatory causes of thyrotoxicosis
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3510970/
Paper #2
Salivary C-Reactive Protein in Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and Subacute Thyroiditis
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2989710/
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