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what long did i actually unaware that im having thyroid deficiency.

recently im detected with hypothyroidism.  i want to know since when thyroid deficiency get into my life. can anybody tell me when thyroid starts in my life. for your kind notice. my TSH is 73. free T3 and free  T4 is in normal range. my age is 26
6 Responses
Avatar universal
With a high TSH like that it is usually suspected as being related to an autoimmune condition called Hashimoto's Thyroiditis.  With Hashi's the autoimmune system erroneously identifies the thyroid gland as foreign to the body and produces antibodies to attack and eventually destroy the gland.  As this progresses the pituitary increases output of TSH in an attempt to stimulate more output of thyroid hormone from the gland.   To determine if Hashi's is present two tests should be done: TPO ab and TG ab.  

Just because your Free T4 and Free T3 are within range does not mean they are adequate for you.  Please post actual test results and reference ranges shown on the lab report.  Even more importantly please tell us about any symptoms you have.  
1 Comments
thanks. my TSH 73.32 free T3 3.54 free T4 0.956 ANTI-TPO Ab 54.75 IU/ml only this test result im having. symptoms  are excesses hair loss, palpitation, muscles are shake, eye brow hair fall, low energy level
Avatar universal
It really doesn't matter how long this has been an issue.  Unless you have a time machine.

What matters is what you do about it now.  please post your actual numbers and reference ranges so we can help advise you one possible course of action .
1 Comments
TSH 73.32 FT3 3.54 FT4 0.956 ANTI-TPO Ab 54.75 IU/ml
1756321 tn?1547095325
Try and recall any symptoms you had in the past (eg: fatigue, weight gain, hair loss) and when those symptoms started.  
Avatar universal
You have give us a number of symptoms that often are associated with hypothyroidism.  Now to evaluate your test results we also need their reference ranges shown on the lab report for those tests.  
1 Comments
f T3 3.54 (2.0 to 4.4 pg/ml) fT4 0.956 (0.7 to 1.8 ng/dl) TSH 73.32 (0.4 to 4.2 ulU/ml) ATPO 54.75 (normal < 34lU/ml)
Avatar universal
Note and compare the following words from an excellent thyroid doctor:  "The free T3 is not as helpful in untreated persons as the free T4 because in the light of a rather low FT4 the body will convert more T4 to T3 to maintain thyroid effect as well as is possible. So the person with a rather low FT4 and high-in-range FT3 may still be hypothyroid. However, if the FT4 is below 1.3 and the FT3 is also rather low, say below 3.4 (range 2 to 4.4 at LabCorp) then its likely that hypothyroidism is the cause of a person's symptoms."  

Your test results show a high TSH and high Thyroid Peroxidase antibodies, indicative of having Hashimoto's Thyroiditis.   With Hashi's the autoimmune system erroneously identifies the thyroid gland as foreign to the body and produces antibodies to attack and eventually destroy the gland.  As this proceeds the pituitary gland produces more TSH in an effort to stimulate more output of thyroid hormone from the thyroid gland.  

You have symptoms that are frequently associated with hypothyroidism and also your test results (even though in range) also indicate the likelihood of hypothyroidism.  So  you need to get your doctor to start you on thyroid medication and increase your dosages as needed to relieve symptoms.   Symptom relief should be all important, not just test results, and especially not TSH results when taking thyroid medication.  

In addition, hypothyroidism is correctly defined as "insufficient T3 effect in tissue throughout the body due to inadequate supply of, or response to, thyroid hormone.   The response can be affected by a number of variables, including Reverse T3, cortisol, Vitamin D, B12 and ferritin.  So you need  Reverse T3 and Free T3 tested from the same blood draw, so that the ratio of Free T3 to Reverse T3 can be determined.   Also cortisol should be tested to confirm as optimal.  Vitamin D, B12 and ferritin should be tested and then supplemented as needed to optimize.  D should be at leat 50 ng/mL, B12 in the upper end of its range and ferritin should be at least 100.
Avatar universal
Note and compare the following words from an excellent thyroid doctor:  "The free T3 is not as helpful in untreated persons as the free T4 because in the light of a rather low FT4 the body will convert more T4 to T3 to maintain thyroid effect as well as is possible. So the person with a rather low FT4 and high-in-range FT3 may still be hypothyroid. However, if the FT4 is below 1.3 and the FT3 is also rather low, say below 3.4 (range 2 to 4.4 at LabCorp) then its likely that hypothyroidism is the cause of a person's symptoms."  

Your test results show a high TSH and high Thyroid Peroxidase antibodies, indicative of having Hashimoto's Thyroiditis.   With Hashi's the autoimmune system erroneously identifies the thyroid gland as foreign to the body and produces antibodies to attack and eventually destroy the gland.  As this proceeds the pituitary gland produces more TSH in an effort to stimulate more output of thyroid hormone from the thyroid gland.  

You have symptoms that are frequently associated with hypothyroidism and also your test results (even though in range) also indicate the likelihood of hypothyroidism.  So  you need to get your doctor to start you on thyroid medication and increase your dosages as needed to relieve symptoms.   Symptom relief should be all important, not just test results, and especially not TSH results when taking thyroid medication.  

In addition, hypothyroidism is correctly defined as "insufficient T3 effect in tissue throughout the body due to inadequate supply of, or response to, thyroid hormone.   The response can be affected by a number of variables, including Reverse T3, cortisol, Vitamin D, B12 and ferritin.  So you need  Reverse T3 and Free T3 tested from the same blood draw, so that the ratio of Free T3 to Reverse T3 can be determined.   Also cortisol should be tested to confirm as optimal.  Vitamin D, B12 and ferritin should be tested and then supplemented as needed to optimize.  D should be at leat 50 ng/mL, B12 in the upper end of its range and ferritin should be at least 100.
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